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Discussion Starter #1
So, sometimes I like to think outside the box.

Exhaust gasses are hot. Hot air rises.

With the exhaust on the bottom of the engine, that exhaust heats up the air around it, and that air rises up to heat up the intake air and the intercooler, which you're trying to keep cool.

If you swapped the heads around (this wouldn't necessarily be easy, and might require serious head fabrication), so that the intake ports were at the bottom, and the exhaust ports were on top, you wouldn't have that problem.

Am I crazy, or is this as good an idea as it sounds?
 

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So....you'd put the tbe on your roof?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hmm, I tried to sketch this out, but it turn out I suck at sketching, so I'll try to describe one possible solution.

The turbo is mounted on top of the engine, about where the alternator is now. Cold side input from any sort of intake right in front (you're right next to the front of the hood - this is good), cold side output towards an FMIC (again, it's right there - very little tubing required). Hot side input from exhaust headers - this makes for an easy twin scroll setup if desired (since it meets right in the middle), exhaust straight out the back, like existing downpipes, but a bit longer. The intake side of the engine just has to pipe air from the fmic into an intake manifold on the bottom there.

Again, just one idea for a solution.
 

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Interesting notion. :) If it really was that much better, Subaru would already be doing this.

What do other flat engines use (Porsche, VW Bug)?

I'm thinking it is better to have fuel flow down along with gravity, especially back in the carburetor days.
 

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And the oil pan is going where if the intake is on the bottom?
 

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Yeah, I'd like to help with the thermodynamics of how this would work, but I'm four beers deep already, sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Happy New Years, here's hoping I'm not the only one without a pounding headache :p

And the oil pan is going where if the intake is on the bottom?
The intake doesn't have to be exactly like it is now - we have a similar exhaust manifold going around the oil pan anyway... the only thing I could think of it that the pcv would need to be rerouted...
 

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If we're talking theoretical engines dry sump oiling would be the way to go anyways, so you don't have to worry about an oil pan.
 

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Put the left head on the right and the right head on the left, block staying where it is. turbo is at the back of the motor but now on the left and intake is custom to fit around the oil pan.
I get it, and while this could work, good ceramic coatings and wraps would net you most of these parisitic heat losses back and with less headache and cost.
That being said, Id like to see someone try it and see if it has any substantial gains...
 

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Put the cylinders in line instead of having a boxer configuration, and lay the motor on its side. Gordon Murray did this with a 1.5L BMW turbo motor.

He was not looking for power gains specifically, as the 1.5L BMW was already making 800 hp in extended use and 1000+ hp for hot lap qualifying. He was looking for a lower, cleaner aero profile and laying the motor on its side seems reasonable.

The car was not particularly successful.

BMW have continued to do this sort of thing with their inline 4s though. They initially didn't have a 1.0L 4 ready to go, so they used a Peugeot motor laid on its side longitudinally on the K series. They still make a K-style in the same configuration.
 
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