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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at new all-seasons for my 2015 WRX (i know winter tires would be preferred) and the tire I am interested in (Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 03) comes in either V or Y speed rating? Which would be appropriate for this car? I am not racing it or anything - simply used as a daily driver. Thanks.
 

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Check your current tyres it owner's manual, or buy the Y.
 

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Well lets look at this. V speed rated tires are rated up to 149mph. Y speed rated tires are rated up to 186mph. I would sure hope that you don't plan on going any vaster than 149mph so there is no need to go any higher of a speed rating than V.

Sauce: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=35
 

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Well lets look at this. V speed rated tires are rated up to 149mph. Y speed rated tires are rated up to 186mph. I would sure hope that you don't plan on going any vaster than 149mph so there is no need to go any higher of a speed rating than V.
Always prepare for the unexpected. First off, if the car is capable of getting close to a speed then have equipment which is meant for that speed. Here are some realistic "what-if's" that the OP might be faced with during his lifetime:

  1. Random gang attack, OP needs to get out quick but tire blows?
  2. Car thief steals car for use as a getaway vehicle, tires blows, loses legs, sues?
  3. Zombie Apocalypse
I'm telling you, something bad is coming!
 

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I don't understand why this is being treated as a choice.

It's only a choice if the manufacturer specifies a V. In that case, a V or higher can be used -- and specifically, a V or higher can be mounted.

Why do I point out what can be mounted?

Theoretical question: If you ran a tyre shop and someone came in insisting that your shop sold to them and then fit onto their car anything not meeting the car manufacturer's specifications, would you do it?

If I were shopping I might chose to fit an S for winters. If I were running a shop... Well... I think I've made my point.
 

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I don't understand why this is being treated as a choice.

It's only a choice if the manufacturer specifies a V. In that case, a V or higher can be used -- and specifically, a V or higher can be mounted.
The manufacture specifies a tire they know to be safe with any reasonable use of the car in stock format. That doesn't mean lesser tires are not safe if they meet the load rating and are not driven in excess of the speed rating of that tire. It also doesn't mean the OEM specs are safe on a modded car. Due diligence is required, but after that there is a choice.
 

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The manufacture specifies a tire they know to be safe with any reasonable use of the car in stock format. That doesn't mean lesser tires are not safe if they meet the load rating and are not driven in excess of the speed rating of that tire. It also doesn't mean the OEM specs are safe on a modded car. Due diligence is required, but after that there is a choice.
Perhaps in your country liability is treated differently legally.

In the event of an accident -- involving the tyre or not, that doesn't really matter much, regrettably... -- would you see it as actionable if a shop fitted tyres onto a car of a lesser rating than specified by the manufacturer?

Is that actionable in your eyes?
 

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Perhaps in your country liability is treated differently legally.

In the event of an accident -- involving the tyre or not, that doesn't really matter much, regrettably... -- would you see it as actionable if a shop fitted tyres onto a car of a lesser rating than specified by the manufacturer?

Is that actionable in your eyes?
From a documentation perspective, the owners manual (US and Canada) makes a suggestion about using the specified tire size and type, but does not say it is mandatory to meet those specs (only what can change if you don't, such as clearances and speed readings). It does however state that you must make sure all four tires are of the same type (with reasons why as well), and the plaque on my door only lists cold pressures and maximum vehicle load (but this might be Canada specific).

From an availability perspective, no winter tires meet the OEM specs. If there was a liability problem then no shop could fit winter tires without a potential legal challenge.

From a liability perspective, if the OEM were to say that you have to use the OEM spec (235/45/17 94W for the 2015 WRX) then they are also saying that their spare is not good enough (thus making them liable for any accidents as a result of a spare tire "event").

Given that I am sure Subaru dealerships wouldn't sell winter tires if they were not appropriate, and that Subaru state driving limitations for using the spare tire rather than making them meet the OEM specification, it becomes our due diligence which is required to ensure that we are using the correct tire for the intended use of the car and the load weight. My tire guy is very careful to explain speed ratings to customers when selling them tires - If I was in an accident and had chosen to use a lower rated tire, then for sure the liability is on me, not him or Subaru. Not to mention that even the lesser equipment can exceed the speed limits considerably and can therefore be claimed to be suitable for the car.

Edit: It doesn't matter how I write this, it comes across as a little condescending to me. Please don't take it that way SD_GR, I'm just trying to be factual and logical.
 

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From an availability perspective, no winter tires meet the OEM specs. No shop could therefore fit winter tires if there was a liability problem.
The OP mentioned a Y. Since Y exceeds W, Y meets the W rating.

From a liability perspective, if the OEM were to say that you have to use the OEM spec (235/45/17 94W for the 2015 WRX) then they are also saying that their spare is not good enough (thus making them liable for any accidents as a result of a spare tire "event").
That's right, the spare isn't good enough. They state this to protect themselves and less importantly, us. They limit speed -- and so, their liability -- with the spare. The lower speed is stated on the spare itself and in the manual.

Given that I am sure Subaru dealerships wouldn't sell winter tires if they were not appropriate, and that Subaru state driving limitations for using the spare tire rather than making them meet the OEM specification, it becomes our due diligence which is required to ensure that we are using the correct tire for the intended use of the car and the load weight. My tire guy is very careful to explain speed ratings to customers when selling them tires - If I was in an accident and had chosen to use a lower rated tire, then for sure the liability is on me, not him or Subaru. Not to mention that even the lesser equipment can exceed the speed limits considerably and can therefore be claimed to be suitable for the car.
You're not wrong and you're not illogical.

I'd still not fit a tyre of lower speed rating if it were my shop, because litigation is not limited by logic.

EDIT: and again, yes, I'd even fit an S on my own car for winters.

_________
_________

Reading this again, I wondered what made me over-think and over-analyze to such a ridiculous degree. From memory, it's my local Costco; they will only fit the same size and speed rating specified by the maker in the manual. I'm clearly over-thinking, sorry. SD
 
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