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i woke up this morning to my dad telling me that my left front tire was nearly flat. i took it off the car and inflated it up to 40psi and sprayed it down with windex to look for the leak, low and behold, the plug that was used to fix a hole from a screw a few months ago is leaking. i played around with the plug for a while till it stopped leaking but im going to have it redone, this time by a shop (i did the original plug myself) when i was ready to put the tire back on i noticed that the inside of the tire was almost down to no tread :confused: and i have a sh!tload of tread left over the rest of the tire. i check the rest of the tires and theyre all like that. im figuring its a camber/alignment issue and i know that the factory alignment sucks and since i bought it used i dont know if it was ever aligned after original purchase. so now i have an appointment on monday for a full allignment and tire repair 50 bucks for the alignment and 15 for the patch/plug. my only concern now is that my tires wont pass inspection thats coming up next month. they were awesome tires too, Dunlop SP Sport 5000s. any insight to all of this? any personal experience yourselves of a similar situation? will tires pass inspection even if the inside of the tire has almost no tread? thanks guys

EDIT: my suspension is completely stock
 

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Thats kinda weird because my Rex ate only the outside of my tires. I got new tires, springs and set my alignment to 1/16" toe in, -1.0 degree negative camber for the front. In the rear I am running no toe and -.6 degrees camber. I can go with a bit more camber but that requires me to get camber bolts but right now the tire wear is pretty even.
 

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that's a simple alignment. It can go out with time and there is nothing you can do but get it aligned...especially if your stock for suspension. Get a patch at costco cause they are guaranteed not to leak and they are free if your a member.
 

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Likely toe out of whack. Unfortunately brand rexes right off the lot have been known (actually a prety high %) to have crappy alignments.

Tire repair- never go w/ just a plug on a performance vehicle (or performance tire H rated or over)

This is how the tire should have been repaired (from goodyear):

CAREFULLY REMOVE THE TIRE COMPLETELY FROM THE RIM.
2. Locate the puncture on the inside of the tire and circle with crayon.
3. Remove puncturing object if it is still in the tire.
4. Carefully inspect tire on a good tire spreader, with ample light, which will show any cracks, breaks, punctures, damaged or broken beads.
5. Check liner for cuts, cracks, or holes which may cause the tubeless liner to lose air.
6. Check the injury with an inspection awl:
a. Determine size and angle of injury
b. Check for ply or belt separation

7. Reject any tire that has separation, loose cords, damaged bead(s), or any other non-repairable injury.
8. If the hole is simple and round, steps 9 through 17 of the puncture repair procedure will be successful.

NOTE: If the hole shows evidence of fabric splitting, such an injury cannot be properly repaired using this puncture repair procedure. Such an injury must be skived out and repaired as a section (reinforced) repair, which will maintain the serviceability of the tire, but will invalidate the tire's speed rating. If a section repair is necessary, the customer must be advised, before the repair is made, that the tire will lose its speed rating, and must not exceed operation at normal highway speeds.

9. Use a pre-buff cleaner and a scraper to remove contaminants from the liner in the area to be buffed around the injury.
10. Use a 7/32"carbide cutter for 1/4" repairs to clean out the puncture.
a. Make sure that the drill follows the direction of the puncturing object.
b. Always drill from inside to outside of tire.

11. Using chemical vulcanizing cement, lightly coat at least 1/2 of the tapered end of the repair plug. Install the plug in the prepared puncture according to the manufacturer's instructions. Trim the liner side of the plug slightly higher than the surface of the liner without stretching the plug.
12. Center the patch (or patch template) over the injury without removing the backing. Adhere to patch or template instructions, as to positioning as related to bead location. Mark around the outside edge of the patch, approximately 1/4" larger than the patch.
13. Buff the liner and plug at the puncture location. The buffed area should be slightly larger than the patch. The buffed surface should be finely grained (RMA 1 or 2 texture) and even for proper bonding. Use care to prevent burning the rubber with the buffing tool. Do not buff through the liner. Do not buff into the marking crayon.
14. Clean the buffing dust from the tire using only a vacuum or brush. Do not use gasoline or other petroleum solvents on the buffed area.
15. Coat the buffed liner surface and the patch with one evenly applied coat of chemical vulcanizing cement in accordance with the recommendations of the repair materials manufacturer. Allow the cement to dry thoroughly. Do not touch the cemented areas.
16. Install the patch with the beads of the tire in the relaxed position. Position the patch over the puncture according to the markings on the patch. Stitch the entire patch starting from the center, keeping the strokes close together to avoid trapping air under the patch.
17. Cut off the protruding end of the plug about 1/8" above the tread surface.
18. FINAL INSPECTION - The repair must seal the inner liner and fill the injury. After remounting and inflating check the repair, both beads and valve with a soap solution to assure a complete seal.

Big Sky
 

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Discussion Starter #8
actually im hoping that the place that im taking it to will actually do that, not just plug it, but we'll see. i think ill have better luck if i get a really good/almost perfect alignment (tip/bribe the guy?) and new tires and just get the alignment checked every few months or so

thanks again

btw, ill get before and after reports and let you guys know exactly what was up and hopefully you guys can tell me if he did a good job or not, im a noob at this
 
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