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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a 2018 wrx with the Fa20Dit. I am doing a rebuild from a spun rod bearing. I was replacing the stock oil cooler I need one to replace the stock oil cooler. Tehran I look them up there is the thermostatic and non thermostatic, what is the difference between the two?
 

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Did oil temp cause the bearing failure, because if not it isn't worth doing as the factory system is more than capable.
 

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I’m not sure I was thinking oil pressure but I’ve heard it needs replaced with a spun bearing
 

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I’m not sure I was thinking oil pressure but I’ve heard it needs replaced with a spun bearing
The dealership should have the correct part. Unless this is a track only vehicle I wouldn't waste money on aftermarket oil coolers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok thanks I don’t think it was oil temp it stayed at 200 then like 215 when I’m on it
 

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Yeah, spend money where it benefits you. Good tires, brake pads, rotors, ss brake lines, stiffer suspension bushings, stiffer shifter bushings.

Oil is designed to be comfortable upnto 250° at 215 it's fine.
 

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Is this a daily driver or a track-only vehicle?

If the former, I question the need for an oil cooler, but if you do feel the need absolutely be sure that it is thermostatically controlled.
 

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I wouldn’t say it’s a daily or track just something to Cruse in but when I drive it it’s usually drive hard hints the motor rebuild.
 

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Usually the oil and water temperatures will track together, which makes sense given that the coolant is used to preheat the oil and then to cool it via the same flying saucer thing above the oil filter (where the oil ring is that leaks every 10 years or so).

The highest I've seen my oil go is 110°. Usually it's below 100°. In fact I gave up on a gauge for it since that just adds another worry for leaks etc. It's not clear to me if that makes any difference or what a normal temperature is. A better indicator would be water temperature. That too can exceed 100° since the system is pressurized. 95° is a hot day out and traffic.

EDIT: Just saw you've got a different motor. Sorry. Still, the principles are the same. Unless you can document somehow that you've got an oil temperature issue, you're adding complexity and failure points and asking for trouble.
 
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