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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys and gals, I have a Perrin short-ram intake in my 2006 WRX and I'm wondering if there are any heat shield solutions already available without having to buy an entirely new intake. So far, the performance from the intake has been great, but I have noticed some pretty high intake temps, and I'd like to cut down on that as much as possible. My headers are wrapped, my turbo is ceramic coated on the compressor housing and the exhaust housing, and I also have a turbo blanket installed. My downpipe is not wrapped, but I'm thinking that might be next. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

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If Perrin doesn't make one then you're likely looking at having something custom fabricated. If you don't care how it looks it will be a cheap and easy job, but if you want it to be pretty I'd be prepared to spend some cash.

I would go ahead and wrap the downpipe in the mean time if it's something you're concerned about.
 

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I'd not wrap any of the exhaust stuff. I have always thought the whole idea is to get heat out of the engine post-burn, and also cool the turbo/intake charge. Wrapping these things just seems to me to defeat the purpose. I'd insulate my intake instead. (in fact this is what I did...)
 

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I'd not wrap any of the exhaust stuff. I have always thought the whole idea is to get heat out of the engine post-burn, and also cool the turbo/intake charge. Wrapping these things just seems to me to defeat the purpose. I'd insulate my intake instead. (in fact this is what I did...)
Yeah it keeps the exhaust hot and thus increases the efficiency.

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seriously?, so i could jack my car up and wrap the exhaust with aluminum foil? assuming i could figure out how to keep it there i would see increased hp?
Anything you use to increase the heat retention in the exhaust will provide some benefit. You'll likely not feel it in the butt Dyno however on an engine brake there will be some level of consistent positive result. Wrapping exhausts and blanketing turbos not only keeps the air moving faster through the exhaust, it can also reduce the temperature under the hood keeping things around the engine cooler. On vehicles with unshielded short ram intakes this can also lower the incoming air temperature.

You have to keep in mind an engine is an air pump, the more efficiently air enters and leaves the system the more power the engine can produce over a wider range.

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seriously?, so i could jack my car up and wrap the exhaust with aluminum foil? assuming i could figure out how to keep it there i would see increased hp?

Personally, I would use header wrap. It insulates well, and will be more durable and easier to install.. seeing as how that's exactly what it's designed for.



aluminum is thermally conductive, it would actually radiate heat away faster. you think we use it to cook cause it blocks heat?

Aluminum foil is actually a GREAT insulator. It reflects radiant heat back at the source, and when crumpled and folded in to many layers the trapped pockets of air between the layers prevent heat from transferring from one layer to the next.. plus it won't burn up unless you're getting it above 1600°F. Metal in general is a good insulator for these applications, hence the reason why turbo, exhaust manifold, and catalytic converter heat shields are all made of metal.

At one point I made a cheap DIY turbo blanket out of a roll of heavy duty aluminum foil.. shortly after driving I was able to briefly touch to crumpled foil without burning my hand.
 

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While this doesn't help with your issue of higher temperatures into the compressor, by relocating the IAT sensor to the TMIC, you could negate some of the negative effects of the SRI like pulled ignition advance based on IAT. Since you're monitoring the intake temps pre-intercooler, you might be pulling timing unnecessarily due to the way those compensation tables are setup. Even if you're not tuning fueling with speed-density, you can benefit from IAT relocation. Beyond that, you're likely going to have to DIY fabricate a shield (or modify an existing aftermarket one to work) or buy another intake. You can always look on the used market and sell the one you have to try to keep expenditures to a minimum.

rqjoe said:
I'd not wrap any of the exhaust stuff. I have always thought the whole idea is to get heat out of the engine post-burn, and also cool the turbo/intake charge. Wrapping these things just seems to me to defeat the purpose. I'd insulate my intake instead. (in fact this is what I did...)
For optimum performance, EGTs should be in the ~850°C (1560°F) range.

To put it simply, heat is energy (more heat = more energy). Hotter gasses travel faster than cooler gasses.

The benefit to wrapping exhaust components and using turbo blankets is that you retain the heat in the exhaust, which helps to spool the turbocharger quicker. The exhaust gas goes into the turbo "hotside" (the hot exhaust air is then sent out the exhaust via the downpipe/catback) and the intake air goes into the compressor side (and is sent to the intercooler). By wrapping your pre-turbo exhaust and hotside (as well as the portion of the downpipe that's in the engine bay ahead of the firewall), you're also reducing radiant heat from exhaust components, which can lead to heat soak in the engine compartment.

The only downsides are:
1) Older wraps could collect flammable liquids (e.g., oil) and cause fires. Newer "titanium" / "lava" wraps seem to not have this issue like older fiberglass wrap did.
2) Expense (financial / time). It takes time and money to do a good wrap job on an exhaust part.
3) Increased wear/tear on components. The increased heat could cause issues with the metal if it's not strong enough (cracked exhaust manifolds). The wrap can collect rock salt deposits which may cause increased corrosion.

Overall, I feel the benefits far outweigh the negatives. If you can coat the part and wrap it, you've knocked corrosion off the list of downsides (at the expense of your wallet).
 

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BananaSammiches said:
I feel like we're getting really off-topic, guys. I appreciate some of your input, but I'm only asking for solutions for a possible air intake heat shield.
BananaSammiches said:
My downpipe is not wrapped, but I'm thinking that might be next. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!
You brought up that downpipe wrapping may be "next" in your OP. Apologies that a discussion about exhaust wrapping happened :rolleyes:

If all you want is info on heat shields:
MainFrame said:
If Perrin doesn't make one then you're likely looking at having something custom fabricated.
EJ257 said:
you're likely going to have to DIY fabricate a shield (or modify an existing aftermarket one to work)
I don't know of any people who have custom fabricated their own heat shield or modified another manufacturer one to work with the Perrin SRI that have created tutorial threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You brought up that downpipe wrapping may be "next" in your OP. Apologies that a discussion about exhaust wrapping happened :rolleyes:

If all you want is info on heat shields:



I don't know of any people who have custom fabricated their own heat shield or modified another manufacturer one to work with the Perrin SRI that have created tutorial threads.
I included that tidbit of information in my OP in the hopes that it would actually deter the discussion on exhaust wrapping, by letting people know that I was already aware of using exhaust wraps to reduce engine bay temperatures. Next time I'll be sure to further clarify.

Additionally, I am already aware of the pros and cons of exhaust wrapping, and I'm already taking steps in that direction, so the only thing I really need to know is if there are heat shields for the intake I have. All of the other information presented in this thread is information of which I was already aware. Hope that helps alleviate some confusion.

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Your radiator uses surface area to remove heat. The aluminum is great at absorbing the heat off of the contents. Wrapping your exhaust or turbo in it will not have the surface area of an intercooler or radiator so as it gets hot there is nowhere for the heat to go. Aluminum foil also has 2 distinct finishes. A shiny side and a matte side. The shiny side works great for reflecting heat back and if wrapped in would reflect a great deal of the thermal radiation of the exhaust components. Coupled with layers, the pockets of air adding to the insulating effect of the aluminum would indeed function as a exhaust wrap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Your radiator uses surface area to remove heat. The aluminum is great at absorbing the heat off of the contents. Wrapping your exhaust or turbo in it will not have the surface area of an intercooler or radiator so as it gets hot there is nowhere for the heat to go. Aluminum foil also has 2 distinct finishes. A shiny side and a matte side. The shiny side works great for reflecting heat back and if wrapped in would reflect a great deal of the thermal radiation of the exhaust components. Coupled with layers, the pockets of air adding to the insulating effect of the aluminum would indeed function as a exhaust wrap.
If you guys are going to have a discussion about the use of aluminum when it pertains to heat management, can you do it somewhere else? My phone is getting blown up with notifications from replies that have nothing to do with the original question. Thanks.

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If you guys are going to have a discussion about the use of aluminum when it pertains to heat management, can you do it somewhere else? My phone is getting blown up with notifications from replies that have nothing to do with the original question. Thanks.

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It has everything to do with your question. You want to lower the temp of your incoming air, insulating the hot things in your engine bay is a great start, especially since you have a short ram that brings the intake close to the hot engine block. Even box will heat up from the surrounding air and the hot air pulled into it.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It has everything to do with your question. You want to lower the temp of your incoming air, insulating the hot things in your engine bay is a great start, especially since you have a short ram that brings the intake close to the hot engine block. Even box will heat up from the surrounding air and the hot air pulled into it.

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As I already stated, I am well aware of the pros and cons of using thermal wraps on exhaust piping to lower engine bay temps, and I am already planning to do so. My question about a potential heat shield for my intake is so I can have an extra layer of protection from the heart. No, using aluminum as a heat management solution for exhaust piping is not a legitimate one, so it's irrelevant.

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DIY time...
However, the how to threads easily found via Google search are older, and many in all likelyhood will have lost the images due to photobucket.
 
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