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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wanted to know what the general consensus is on handbrake turning the WRX, and what the safest procedure is, if any?

I've done it a couple of times already, BUT I always disengage the clutch while giving a quick tug on the brake to send the tail out, and then I re-engage the clutch and put the hammer down. I'm pretty sure it would not be good to do it without clutching, but am I ok doing it the way I do...?

Thanks

-Pace
 

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pace said:
...BUT I always disengage the clutch while giving a quick tug on the brake to send the tail out....
I'm assuming your pushing the clutch in (or in neutral).... The car can easily get out of control on a quick turn whenever you are in neutral. The only real damage I see might be threadwear and the brake cable loosening in the long term. If you are e-braking while in gear (not in neutral or clutch not pushed in), there's all sort of problems that can go along with that. I also hear rumors that the car may die out if the rear wheels lock up or any wheel while moving.
 

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Personally I'd say don't abuse your viscous coupling diff like that. There are various ways to drift and handbraking makes you have only own hand on the steering(albeit, you don't really have to steer much when using handbrake either).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
pace said:

...BUT I always disengage the clutch....
I push the clutch in, tug the e-brake, and then as soon as I get the tail loose I release the e-brake and then I release the clutch and get back on the power. This was the way I was taught to do it in the UK, but technique aside; would this damage the center differential since I have the front wheels turning but not the rear, OR does the disengaged clutch keep everything 'safe'?

Anyone here driven a WRX in rally school? Do they cover handbrake turns?

Thanks
-Pace
 

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Re: Re: Safe to e-brake?

Sherb said:

I'm assuming your pushing the clutch in (or in neutral).... The car can easily get out of control on a quick turn whenever you are in neutral. The only real damage I see might be threadwear and the brake cable loosening in the long term. If you are e-braking while in gear (not in neutral or clutch not pushed in), there's all sort of problems that can go along with that. I also hear rumors that the car may die out if the rear wheels lock up or any wheel while moving.
but if you break w/ the clutch in, it doesn't hurt the drivetrain, right? rally drivers use the handbrake into turns all the time (of course their car is better, but still) so whats so bad about doing it w/ a stock wrx?
 

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I'm thinking the car might die out if you are in gear, the clutch is not pushed in, and you lock up the wheels. The WRX has all sorts of differential so I can't say I'm an expert with e-braking. As far as I'm concerned, it is probably safe to do so but I wouldn't try it myself for a while except for "emergency" situations ;).
 

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Pace,

The answer to your question is: No, you will seriously screw up your center and rear differential by hand brake turning your WRX. While not as severe in neutral or clutched, the car and hence the drivetrain still has momentum and the relatively simple WRX AWD system can't handle the sudden shock of locking the rear wheels. If you want to do this on a regular basis buy a Mitsu Evo VI or VII.

-Jim

pace said:
Just wanted to know what the general consensus is on handbrake turning the WRX, and what the safest procedure is, if any?
 

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I agree with Jim, except for the part about the EVO VI. The standard EVO VI also came with a viscous coupling if I'm not mistaken. It still have the AYC like the new EVO VII, but the VII benefits from a new electro hydro center diff to allow handbrake turns (even without clutching in-which makes it safer as well, driving 10/10th and trying to turn while in clutched in neutral and no front braking?)....The STi also has an electro center.
 

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Re: Re: Safe to e-brake?

pace said:


I push the clutch in, tug the e-brake, and then as soon as I get the tail loose I release the e-brake and then I release the clutch and get back on the power. This was the way I was taught to do it in the UK, but technique aside; would this damage the center differential since I have the front wheels turning but not the rear, OR does the disengaged clutch keep everything 'safe'?

Anyone here driven a WRX in rally school? Do they cover handbrake turns?

Thanks
-Pace
Well if you press the clutch your doing nothing for the drive train. This doesnt release the center diff. All it does is stops bushing power to the rear. My advise treat it as you would like it to last.
 

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According to this story the handbrake on the WRC Subaru "disengages the back half of the all-wheel-drive system".

Also note that the WRC Subaru's handbrake locks the rear brakes while our WRX handbrake engages a drum brake on one of the rear wheels (don't remember which one).
 

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only ONE of the rear wheels? hmmm....i'll hafta check my car and see

thats very interesting...why would they do that? or is it normal to lock only one wheel?
 

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I don't know about the Subaru, havn't looked yet...but my 3000GT had the drum parking brakes on Both rear wheels. I've adjusted them before to grab harder, and the Subie's Rear discs look the same as the 3000GT's. Both of the WRX's wheels have the drums on both sides of the discs.
 

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One rear e-brake? If that were the case, you'd also probably see a bunch of cars tilted towards the curb or street when parked on a hill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Every vehicle I have ever worked on has had the e-brake linked to both wheels at the rear. A simple cable setup is pretty common - either using a single cable from the e-brake lever that connects to a twin cable further back, or sometimes using twin cables hooked directly to the e-brake lever. Anyway I'm pretty sure that the WRX does not only e-brake one wheel, but regardless; I think we're agreed that handbrake turns are not good for the center viscous coupling.

-Pace
 

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FYI older Soobies

Hi All!

My old GL wagons (thru mid '80s anyway) have the hand brake connected to the FRONT discs! And it is far too weak to stop a moving car, you can hardly feel it being applied! Works OK for a parking brake, tho; probably all it was intended to do.
Just thought you mite get a grin out of that tidbit!
ByeBye! S.
 

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pace said:
Every vehicle I have ever worked on has had the e-brake linked to both wheels at the rear. A simple cable setup is pretty common - either using a single cable from the e-brake lever that connects to a twin cable further back, or sometimes using twin cables hooked directly to the e-brake lever. Anyway I'm pretty sure that the WRX does not only e-brake one wheel, but regardless; I think we're agreed that handbrake turns are not good for the center viscous coupling.

-Pace
wouldn't that kill your differential if you had to pulll the emergency brake when you were moving forward (if the e-brake only locked one rear wheel)?
 

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Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think it has to do with the relative speed of the wheels and whether or not the clutch in engaged. Clearly, if no power is going to the tranny (i.e., clutch engaged) then the damage induced by trying to force power to wheels that are locked is not going to heppen. On the other hand, the wheels are still going to be spinning at different rates. But, to lock up a viscous coupling diff, the wheels (whether front or back, or left ot right) have to moving at very different speeds, I'd estimate well over 100 MPH (picturing a spinning wheel and a stationary wheel). Thats why a viscous diffs lock up when one wheel starts to spin. So, doing an ebrake turn with the clutch in at 30 MPH will only cause a 30 MPH wheel speed differential, which is not likely enough top lock up the diff, SIGNIFICANTLY. I say SIGNIFICANTLY, because the center diff will always be locked to some degree and from what I have read, never actually locks completely. Damage to the center diff is caused by overheating of the viscous fluid in the diff. So, its all about minimizing damage with the ebrake. Do it with the clutch in at low speeds and you are still causing damage as you are heating up the fluid somewhat due to the increased differential speed, albeit to a far less degree than if you driving straight at 200 km/hr and yanked up the ebrake. Then again, you are causing damage to the diffs even by going around a very sharp corner at high speeds as the diffs will spin a different speeds. Quite obviously, the differential speed is less and therefore, the "damage" will be less.
 

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OceanStateScoob said:
Most (if not all?) cars with 4-wheel disk brakes employ a single drum brake on one of the rear wheels for the parking/emergency brake.
I know for a fact that Hondas don't. When you pull on the parking brake lever, the cam rotates and applies pressure to the pin. This applies pressure to the sleeve piston and piston, which keep the pads against the rotor.
 
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