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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In the diagram below, I've highlighted what parts I'm replacing in this procedure. They are the two bushings on the front lateral link, left side, in rear suspension of car. The SPT Sedan Kit I bought came with these for both sides, for a total of (4) rubber bushings referred to as "Bush B (diagram#12)" for the inside one, and "Bush A (diagram#10)" for the outside one. It is important to note that the two bushes ARE different in their inside diameter so DON'T mix them up or you won't be able to reassemble your suspension. The Bush A also works for the Rearmost lateral link next to the hub housing, as indicated by the diagram number "10". Also note that diagram#9 IS different and is referred to as Bush C. This one has the cam-bolt to adjust the toe-in of the rear wheels and is thus a little different inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
(1)
First, you jack the car and remove the wheels (19mm) and swaybar (12mm), including the endlink (14mm) to keep it out of the way.

(2)
next, remove the two bolts (12mm) that hold the Parking Brake Cable and Brake Line to the Trailing Link as shown here:


(3) then remove the 7"long bolt with self-lock nut (19mm) which fastens both lateral links to the hub housing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
(4) now you have to get the Front Lateral Link off on the other end. This is complicated by the proximity to the gas tank and the axle, which means you won't have room for air tools or even a breaker bar unless you remove the axle. I chose to jerry-rig this contraption of two 17mm wrenches and an extender to get it. Having the car high off the ground helps you with this part:


This is a picture of the Front Lateral Link. Notice the difference between inner (diff) end and outer (wheel) end is the little nipples close to the inner end:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
This is the tool I'll use to press the bushings in and out:


It is available from Harbor Freight for $39.95:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=38335


(5) now you can push out the two bushings using the C-Frame Press. I used the smallest receiver tube that the kit came with and as you can see, it didn't sit perfectly straight, but the bushing still pushed out, regardless:


(6)
pushing in the new bushing is more difficult but still pretty straightforward. I found it best to clamp the C-Frame in a vise to hold it upright and steady.

Then I greased the face of the bushing I was pushing in (not the face I was pushing against). I also greased the sleeve of the lateral link.

You have to use the "Installer Adapter" part to hold the bushing flat against the link sleeve and then just slowly push it in. If it starts to go in crooked, make a judgement call and either back it out to try again or push farther, hoping it goes in straight. One of mine went it perfectly straight the first try and the other went crooked but still pushed in okay once it was started.

Push it all the way in and a little past the edge to make sure the rubber lip pops out the other side. Then flip the link over and center the metal part and inspect it to make sure both rubber lips are evenly seated into place.

(7)
reassemble all the parts in basically reverse order. When installing the bolts that hold the lateral link on, be cautious not to overtorque them. In a recent issue of The End Wrench , they cautioned about overtorquing those nuts.

according to the service manual, the torque spec for the bolt securing the wheel (Bush A) end is 100ft-lb and the spec for the diff (Bush B) end is 74 ft-lb.


Thoughts on the Press tool:
The Press could be made a lot better if the "Installation Adapter" had a rod welded to it that would go through the middle of the bushing to hold it straight when you're pushing it in. Also, it would be great if the bottom of the C-Frame had more steps to hold various diameter things (like our lateral links) still.
 

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DN,

What do you expect from a $40 tool. Most of the bearing presses are upwards of $100-300 for the set. So at $40, it's very reasonable!!
These tools don't come cheap that's a fact.

Speaking of which...I ordered my own :)

-LostLamb
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
lostlamb - i'm not the least bit dissatisfied with the press. it worked as advertised. My only gripe is that the adapters provided make it hard... but any machine shop can whip you up something better in a matter of minutes.
 
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