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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2016 WRX, and I'm wanting to start doing my own oil changes.

How do most people jack up the car to do this?

Do you jack up just one front side?
Do you use jack stands?
Has anyone chocked both back tires (front and back of tire), and used 2 floor jacks (one on each front side) to raise the car?

I've read some threads that said there is a front center spot to raise the entire front end, and then others that say don't do it.

I'm just trying to figure out the best and safest way to accomplish it.

Jeff
 

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BooSTIng
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Always use jack stands. I have always done it like this.

Place hand brake, and keep in 1st gear.
Jack up one side on the front, place jack stand. Jack up other side, place jack stand.
Go under car and do the oil change.
Then reverse order.

Never ever work under a car without stands.
 

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Master Baiter
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Ramps
Jack the car up from the front jack-plate and use jack-stands
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. It just freaks me out when the back wheels come off the ground. It feels like something will snap or break.

Is there anything wrong with using two jacks to raise the front end, and then use the jack stands? As long as the back wheels are both chocked that is.
 

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Thanks. It just freaks me out when the back wheels come off the ground. It feels like something will snap or break.

Is there anything wrong with using two jacks to raise the front end, and then use the jack stands? As long as the back wheels are both chocked that is.
Sure if you want to run back and forth pumping one up a little then the other. I'm a huge fat man and always jack mine a mile high and have one tire airborne until the other side comes up. I'm sure there is a fair amount of stress on things so I wouldn't open doors with it like that but it should be fine.

Ramps as ej mentioned are also a great idea. Just don't cheap out I've seen them collapse.

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XJman said:
Ramps as ej mentioned are also a great idea. Just don't cheap out I've seen them collapse.
I've seen more scissor jacks / jack stands collapse than ramps...
 

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Thanks. It just freaks me out when the back wheels come off the ground. It feels like something will snap or break.
Do you worry about this when cornering a suggested 40 mph turn at 60 mph? These frames are built to take a beating. The only worry you should have is not using a dedicated jack point.
 

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I've seen more scissor jacks / jack stands collapse than ramps...
Oh, I won't even remotely deny that. I've had a scissor jack collapse while I was jacking a car up before.

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Village Idiot
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Use ramps, they aren't that expensive and most auto parts stores have them in stock. Jack and jack stands are slightly more time consuming than just driving your car up on ramps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree that ramps would be much easier, but most of them that I've seen will not fit under the front of the car unless you build a wooden ramp to drive up on first. If someone has one's that will fit under the front of the car, please list them.

This will be my first time changing the oil on my own, so I think I will go with the two jacks and jack stands. And then leave both the stands and jacks supporting the car. That should be safe enough, I would think. And then I'll look at ramps for the future changes.
 

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I set the parking brake, put it in 1st gear.. jack up one side with a floor jack, put a jack stand under it, jack up the other side, jack stand.. and leave the floor jack there (just a hair lower than the jack stand), and chock one rear wheel.

I have ramps, but they're a pain to dig out of my garage, not to mention heavy.. and they tend to slip forward on my driveway and scrape up the concrete. I only use the ramps if I want the whole car off the ground.



Back in college when I lived in an apartment complex (and hardly had any tools) I would pull around to the back of the parking lot, drive one side of the car up onto a curb, and drain it like that.
 

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I use floor jack on one side (the side that will make the drain plug lower on the BRZ, as the car becomes angled), put jack stand in ahead of the jack. I ease the car down on the jack stand, and test for stability, then leave the floor jack in as a backup.

Car is in 1st, parking brake up, chocks (funky-shaped rocks from our landscaping) in front of and behind the rear wheel that's on the ground. Probably overkill, but I'm really into breathing.
 

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Use ramps, they aren't that expensive and most auto parts stores have them in stock. Jack and jack stands are slightly more time consuming than just driving your car up on ramps.
^^this^^
No need to build wooden "pre ramps", just cut a few 12" sections of 2x4 and put in front of the ramps to get the car up to the ramp.

I was looking at a 2 post lift for my small garage - but this option is interesting for small spaces: Ranger QuickJack BL-5000SLX Portable Lift — 110 Volt, 2 1/2-Ton Capacity, Model# BL-5000SLX 110V
I wonder if there is some sort of adaptation that could be made to make sure to hit the correct lift point for our cars? In any case, I would definitely use jack stands as a back up.
 

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I use race ramps. They are expensive, but well worth it. They will never slip or shoot out from under your wheel when you try to drive up them, like I have experienced with Rhino Ramps. When you change the oil, you want your car to be level so it all drains out, so just jacking up the front won't do.

When I am changing my oil, I just drive up the front ramps, chock the front wheels on the ramps (Probably unnecessary) Then jack up the rear by the rear diff, and lower it onto the wheel chocks, which are at the same height as the front ramps.



If I want to get it on jack stands, so I can remove the wheels, I drive up the front ramps, chock the front wheels, and jack up the rear by the diff, and lower it onto jack stands at the rear/side jack point. I then jack the front by the front jack point/skid plate area, remove the ramps and put jack stands on the front side jack points.

Most jacks won't fit under the front to reach the front center jack point.

The race ramp set will run you around $300, but is completely worth it, if you regularly do your own work/maintenance on your car. It makes it really easy to safely get your car in the air, without having to worry about jackstands, and messing up your side jack points. It always makes me nervous jacking up a car, when the other half is sitting on/balancing on jackstands, so I try to avoid it whenever possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks whiplash. I like that setup, but I'm not sure about the $300. I may just make myself some wood ramps.

Now since you have a 2015+, do you have a shot of this infamous center jack point spot on the front? I just can't seem to find a good answer/stot online anywhere.
 

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Thanks whiplash. I like that setup, but I'm not sure about the $300. I may just make myself some wood ramps.

Now since you have a 2015+, do you have a shot of this infamous center jack point spot on the front? I just can't seem to find a good answer/stot online anywhere.
Yea, there it is:
 

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I use a jack and stands but now I just drive over to my friends shop and put it up on the lift and stand under it lol. Have rhino ramps as well.


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I use cheap steel ramps in the garage . . . they're heavy, but plenty rugged. Due to the angle of the ramps I do use a couple of short 2 x 8s. I haven't had any issues with slippage and feel quite confident while working underneath during the oil change . . . which tends to be a 15-25 minute job start to finish (digging out the tools and equipment to the end stage of picking up and recording the mileage in my maintenance book.)
 
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