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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my question is specifically about clutch and first gear I don't kn know if this is the right place to post this. My question is how do you know if you're letting up on the clutch too slowly in first gear. I know what I need to do but it seems that everytime I try faster I stall the vehicle. I understand that when I let up on the clutch and the RPM start to dip I need to give it more gas to get a smoother faster take off from a stop, but it seems when I let off the clutch and give more gas to go a little faster from a stop all stall the vehicle. So what I've been doing is letting off the clutch slowly and periodically giving more gas which I feel is giving wear to the clutch am I right in assuming that this is wearing the clutch more as if I were to get a smoother take off.

23 years old and I was finally able to afford my dream car and I love driving and I've already put for 500 miles on it and I just got the vehicle 8 days ago I love the experience so far but I want to take care of my new car and not have to go through a thousands of dollars and clutch and transmission replacements.
 

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The WRX is not the best car to learn how to drive stick with, but you're stuck doing so, so...... What I do is give the car a few revs/RMPs before I start to let the clutch out and easy the clutch out.
 

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It takes time to get it right, its also different from car to pickup. I think the best idea is to go to a long stretch of road and stop and start. There is a sweet spot in there that gets the car going perfectly. It takes time to find it, but with a different rig I always start off by depressing the clutch and pressing the gas at the same rate. If it starts to lug, give it gas, but not in a jerk. You are probably wearing down your clutch, but as long as you aren't revving to 5k with the clutch half pressed, its probably not doing too much damage. Just find the sweet spot on your own on a long road while no one's watching, that way you don't get flustered. I know that's what caused most of my stall outs when I was learning to drive clutch. It just takes time, I wouldn't worry too much about wearing out the clutch because you'll learn to drive with time.
 

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Welcome to the community and congrats! If you are trying to move faster from a standstill and you are stalling the car by doing so, you probably are letting clutch out too fast when you feel it engage. At least that was my problem. What you should try and do is make sure when you release the clutch you do it smoothly. What a lot of people tend to do is when they feel the clutch bite they dump it. Don't do that. You will have hold it at the friction point for a bit but not for too long. A good way to get better at smoother first gear starts imo is to practice with no gas. Find a flat place to practice and get really familiar with the bite point of the clutch and know when the car will start to move. Hope this helps a bit, happy boosting!

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I never dump gas I'm not trying to launch I wasn't learning manual on this car I was learning on a mustang that was used for drag racing with am extremely low release point which was easy for me and a ****ty jeep with an extremely high release point and long ass throws.

That being said is 1500 rpm the good place to be when trying to start smoothly from a st9p my problem is I don't account for the rpm drop when the flywheel engages and if I'm at higher rpm it's more forgiving but I feel 2k rpmbis puttingbextreme wear on the clutch with how slow I let up on it
 

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2k is probably close. I agree with ike, try to find the point where you can feel the clutch start to engage. Once you know about where that is gradually give it gas before and after. Obviously you dont want it to lug and you dont want it to jump, so I think its more of a feel thing than getting it to a certain RPM and slowly letting out the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
2k is probably close. I agree with ike, try to find the point where you can feel the clutch start to engage. Once you know about where that is gradually give it gas before and after. Obviously you dont want it to lug and you dont want it to jump, so I think its more of a feel thing than getting it to a certain RPM and slowly letting out the clutch.
Training my mind and body to work with what I want it to do is the problem lol my father told me not to go somewhere and practice it just practice while everyday driving because I'll put unnecessary wear he owned an sti and an evo 9mr and has been driving professionally for ages but I feel his methods may or may not be outdated. I know I need to give it more gas when releasing the clutch but I've gotten so used to just holding the rpm s at a spot when I'm driving I try doing that and get a slow start and a slow let up on the clutch because I'm not keeping the rpm s at 1500 they dip and I leave it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My biggest worry is clutch wear I have bumper to bumper warranty so I'm not too worried about the cost I guess it's just a personal feeling of if I wear out my clutch it's because I got into a grove of doing things wrong and I don't like practicing incorrectly
 

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hmm... well I agree it will put on a little unnecessary wear, but at some point it's better to quickly learn the characteristics of the clutch instead of slowly wearing it down every day by improperly engaging it.. I think learning up front will increase the longevity of the clutch. Like you said it would suck if you get into a bad habit right now, so I'd practice a bit to do it right in the beginning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hmm... well I agree it will put on a little unnecessary wear, but at some point it's better to quickly learn the characteristics of the clutch instead of slowly wearing it down every day by improperly engaging it.. I think learning up front will increase the longevity of the clutch. Like you said it would suck if you get into a bad habit right now, so I'd practice a bit to do it right in the beginning.
I think his main point was not being in real situations i.e. stop signs live traffic etc. I understand pros and cons to both sides I just get frustrated these kinds of things take time I'll stall every so often and have to deal with an impatient pos honking at me i also meed to practice hill starts and slopes because those mess me all up he was telling me to use the ebrake on hill stops is that a good idea? Clutch diwn e brake up give gas and let up on ckutch until i feelbthe car dip and sloely oet off the ebrake
 

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yeah I've found that to be pretty useful. just keep the button pushed in on the brake and let down the lever as you start to move. Also your car might have hill assist on it.. not 100% on that. when I'd stall in public like that i'd freak out and hit the gas more than i needed to cause I was flustered, meaning more wear on the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yeah I've found that to be pretty useful. just keep the button pushed in on the brake and let down the lever as you start to move. Also your car might have hill assist on it.. not 100% on that. when I'd stall in public like that i'd freak out and hit the gas more than i needed to cause I was flustered, meaning more wear on the clutch.
I just feel that would put more wear on breaks and clutch for hill starts I do have hill assist I don't like relying on it.
 

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I think you're better off watching an instructional video on YouTube than trying to gain insight from words. I hate to burst your bubble, but 4EverMetal is right in saying the WRX is not the best car to learn on. WRX's have a reputation for having "unique" clutch response. Moreover, the sweet spot between gas and clutch on turbocharged vehicles is more difficult to find as the throttle pedal will produce more power than naturally aspirated vehicles. You're dealing with a couple different challenges here. All my previous cars have been Mazda's, and clutching on those cars were more easily learned than on a WRX. I've been driving stick since 15 (Currently 28), and will admit the WRX required a lot more practice than other cars. Good luck, man!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aryOUBzWaTI

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+drive+a+stick+shift
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think you're better off watching an instructional video on YouTube than trying to gain insight from words. I hate to burst your bubble, but 4EverMetal is right in saying the WRX is not the best car to learn on. WRX's have a reputation for having "unique" clutch response. Moreover, the sweet spot between gas and clutch on turbocharged vehicles is more difficult to find as the throttle pedal will produce more power than naturally aspirated vehicles. You're dealing with a couple different challenges here. All my previous cars have been Mazda's, and clutching on those cars were more easily learned than on a WRX. I've been driving stick since 15 (Currently 28), and will admit the WRX required a lot more practice than other cars. Good luck, man!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aryOUBzWaTI

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+drive+a+stick+shift
I watched maybe 40 hours worth of different videos on driving manual before I jumped into a car on top of which I learned how to drive on other vehicles before I bought my wrx I say new to manual because it wasn't my primary source of transportation
 

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Welcome to the Club!

It is all down to practice - you'll get it. Find a large level parking lot if need be, and just practice without the distraction of traffic. Before long, you'll discover the fun much of the driving public will never know.

I'd highly recommend NOT using the hill holder feature if so equipped. It'll just keep you from learning a valuable skill.
 

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Flat foot the throttle, dump the clutch and hang on

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I don't think you have too much to worry about when it comes to wear on the clutch. Both my brother and I learned how to drive stick on my 2016 wrx when it was bone stock and we certainly burned the clutch a few times and had quite a few stalls. 42K miles later and it is now stage two and has been on the dyno twice and the OEM clutch is holding up just fine no
slipping through all the abuse. And 4EverMetal is right the wrx isn't very easy to learn on, I wish I had a miata to learn on lol.
 

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It'll help turning "Hill Assist" off until you get a hang of it.
 
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