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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone I got a 2019 WRX in all white. Already got some rally armor mud flaps for it, and that’s about it. I am thinking about getting a cobb Accessport and doing a stage 1 but I am new at it. I’m also thinking about doing an exhaust and a cold air intake Cobb. Any recommendations? What should I look out for, and any risks I may make with the Accessport? Thanks.
 

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With the access port it just depends on how much you value your warranty agreement but other than that if your not worried in that dept just make sure you get a solid tune! Not all OTS tunes are one size fits all so it’s still good to get a pro tune from a good tuner! Congrats on the new wrx though! I love the crystal white pearl color
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With the access port it just depends on how much you value your warranty agreement but other than that if your not worried in that dept just make sure you get a solid tune! Not all OTS tunes are one size fits all so it’s still good to get a pro tune from a good tuner! Congrats on the new wrx though! I love the crystal white pearl color
What do you think of this? See the pic if it attached. IMG_0081.jpg


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Cobb definitely makes high quality products and have a lot of trial and error to go with it. Like I said earlier as long as your not concerned about warranty coverage the “staged” packages from Cobb are nice. You can run into problems if you mix and match parts due to the OTS tune so keeping it as a package is a better way. Just keep an eye on the different gauges on your AP, check fine knock, data log and pay attention to your car and good luck!
 

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I suggest spending some time with your new car and analyze what changes you want to make, if any. Contemplate the full consequences of voiding your motor warranty. In my opinion, you need to have saved enough money for a new motor in case anything goes wrong. Hence, why it's suggested for all responsible Americans to have at least $10,000 in reserve. When I went Cobb stage one/intake on my 15 STi, I made damned sure to have money in the bank to replace a blown motor, on top of my general savings. I took time to be aware of the full risk and I compensated for it.

When I had to get rid of my 15 STi due to unanticipated and unwanted circumstances from a suspension issue (long story), Subaru helped me get into a 2018 STi with generous compensation. At that point, I'd owned a 2013 lightly modded WRX and the 2015 lightly modded STi. Both Cobb stage 1 with Cobb Intake and an exhaust. They were fun and they were loud. Often times, too loud... But, I took some real time to think about doing anything to my 2018 STi, other than light window tint to protect the interior and RA mud flaps to protect the paint.

After really enjoying the car for what it is, I have decided to keep everything else OEM for the foreseeable future. I have a full warranty and I have learned to appreciate the car for the already great experience it provides as intended by Subaru. They did a great job of balancing excitement in a car that's easy to live with. My point is to feel the car out for quite a while so you can truly determine if you can enjoy the car without modifications. This reflection time will allow you to accurately weigh the risks and, if necessary, save up a contingency plan.

But, no one ever listens to me. 'If you must' jump into these mods, Cobb is a safe way to go. They have a good reputation and I firmly believe their offerings are safer than other aftermarket tunes. Good luck.
 

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I suggest spending some time with your new car and analyze what changes you want to make, if any. Contemplate the full consequences of voiding your motor warranty. In my opinion, you need to have saved enough money for a new motor in case anything goes wrong. Hence, why it's suggested for all responsible Americans to have at least $10,000 in reserve. When I went Cobb stage one/intake on my 15 STi, I made damned sure to have money in the bank to replace a blown motor, on top of my general savings. I took time to be aware of the full risk and I compensated for it.

When I had to get rid of my 15 STi due to unanticipated and unwanted circumstances from a suspension issue (long story), Subaru helped me get into a 2018 STi with generous compensation. At that point, I'd owned a 2013 lightly modded WRX and the 2015 lightly modded STi. Both Cobb stage 1 with Cobb Intake and an exhaust. They were fun and they were loud. Often times, too loud... But, I took some real time to think about doing anything to my 2018 STi, other than light window tint to protect the interior and RA mud flaps to protect the paint.

After really enjoying the car for what it is, I have decided to keep everything else OEM for the foreseeable future. I have a full warranty and I have learned to appreciate the car for the already great experience it provides as intended by Subaru. They did a great job of balancing excitement in a car that's easy to live with. My point is to feel the car out for quite a while so you can truly determine if you can enjoy the car without modifications. This reflection time will allow you to accurately weigh the risks and, if necessary, save up a contingency plan.

But, no one ever listens to me. Good luck.
That.
 

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I wouldn't buy any intake that doesn't offer a dry filter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cobb definitely makes high quality products and have a lot of trial and error to go with it. Like I said earlier as long as your not concerned about warranty coverage the “staged” packages from Cobb are nice. You can run into problems if you mix and match parts due to the OTS tune so keeping it as a package is a better way. Just keep an eye on the different gauges on your AP, check fine knock, data log and pay attention to your car and good luck!
Ah ok so what exhaust should I go with that would work well with that? Axle back or a cat back?


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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I suggest spending some time with your new car and analyze what changes you want to make, if any. Contemplate the full consequences of voiding your motor warranty. In my opinion, you need to have saved enough money for a new motor in case anything goes wrong. Hence, why it's suggested for all responsible Americans to have at least $10,000 in reserve. When I went Cobb stage one/intake on my 15 STi, I made damned sure to have money in the bank to replace a blown motor, on top of my general savings. I took time to be aware of the full risk and I compensated for it.

When I had to get rid of my 15 STi due to unanticipated and unwanted circumstances from a suspension issue (long story), Subaru helped me get into a 2018 STi with generous compensation. At that point, I'd owned a 2013 lightly modded WRX and the 2015 lightly modded STi. Both Cobb stage 1 with Cobb Intake and an exhaust. They were fun and they were loud. Often times, too loud... But, I took some real time to think about doing anything to my 2018 STi, other than light window tint to protect the interior and RA mud flaps to protect the paint.

After really enjoying the car for what it is, I have decided to keep everything else OEM for the foreseeable future. I have a full warranty and I have learned to appreciate the car for the already great experience it provides as intended by Subaru. They did a great job of balancing excitement in a car that's easy to live with. My point is to feel the car out for quite a while so you can truly determine if you can enjoy the car without modifications. This reflection time will allow you to accurately weigh the risks and, if necessary, save up a contingency plan.

But, no one ever listens to me. 'If you must' jump into these mods, Cobb is a safe way to go. They have a good reputation and I firmly believe their offerings are safer than other aftermarket tunes. Good luck.
Yea I agree with ya. Put 3,500 miles on the car already and I’ve seen so many videos of people doing the stage 1 Cobb and noticing an extreme difference in response and power. I will stick to only Cobb Accessport and Cobb intake and maybe an axle back a little later and that’s about it. I am doing a window tint as well and I installed rallyarmor mudflaps also.


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Cobb definitely makes high quality products and have a lot of trial and error to go with it. Like I said earlier as long as your not concerned about warranty coverage the “staged” packages from Cobb are nice. You can run into problems if you mix and match parts due to the OTS tune so keeping it as a package is a better way. Just keep an eye on the different gauges on your AP, check fine knock, data log and pay attention to your car and good luck!
Ah ok so what exhaust should I go with that would work well with that? Axle back or a cat back?


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It depends on what you want I suppose, invidia r400 has a nice catback, so does Cobb but both serve more of a sound difference purpose. Less back pressure sure but no need for tune with catback or axle back. I’m ordering the nameless axle back muffler delete for my sti. Mine came with the SPT from factory and it’s not a terrible sound note but strange I guess lol when I get mine installed I’ll let you know how it sounds!
 

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Please be well aware that the moment you flash a tune to the car any hope of engine related warranty being approved is zero, and lower chances of the transmission and driveline. If you have a catastrophic failure (uncommon not unheard of) you need to be prepared to pay for a new engine out of pocket.

That said. The FA20F responds the best to modifications in the intake track. So intake, egr and tgv deletes, better top mount.

If I owned a newer car the first things I would do are the intake, tgv, and egr delete, and appropriate tune. I would completely avoid any intake that doesn't offer a dry filter option such as aem dryflow.
 

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Welcome to the club :)
 
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