ClubWRX Forum banner

should I go for a professional instructed class instead of keep practicing on my own car?

  • Go for instructed class

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Practice on my own

    Votes: 2 100.0%
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Everyone!

So grateful for finding this forum! I kept my 2018 STi in the garage for more than a year since I didn't have time to learn and practice, took it back out last week and the battery died. Jumped it back on and took a 14 miles drive, still didn't get it charge back. Got it replaced, but very concerned since I'm still stalling a lot when I'm driving it.

Saw the engine light blinked on the next day when I was driving it on the highway with traffic, not sure if it was because of something I did wrong. Is it because it was idled for too long or am I damaging it when I'm learning?

This is my first stick shift ever and I never learned how to drive stick shift before, my friends took me to parking lots to learned a few times with it. I don't know if I grinded gears nor if I shifted properly. I think I stepped on the gas too hard sometimes since I didn't want to get stalled, it jerks a lot when I started on 1st gear and when I shifted gears too. My friends told me to feel the engagement point, which I'm still not too sure where that is. Any suggestion on how I can do better?

Will stalling kill my battery? Jumping it back on in the middle of high traffic is not fun at all, but I don't see anywhere to check on my battery life in the owners manual.

I understand that practice makes it prefect, but as I'm only driving my car twice a week now should I go for a professional instructed class instead of keep practicing on my own car? I want to keep my car for a long time and don't want to cause any unforgiving damage to it...

Any tips and helps are greatly appreciated!!!
 

·
Æternum
Joined
·
20,658 Posts
Did you read the ECU codes?

Stalling won't "kill" the battery, but not regularly tending will reduce the battery capacity. Since you let the car sit for more than a year, I imagine the new battery was necessary. Keep it on a tender.

For what it's worth, these cars have a steep learning curve for a standard shift. I have been driving standard for 20 years and have only daily driven an automatic for a short period during those 20 years. I still stall on occasion with my 2015 STI, more than any other car, particularly when starting on an incline and with steering at full lock. These cars have wide tires and high caster and so they have a lot of "resistance" when starting from full steering lock. The hill assist does not do any favors -- it kills the sensation of a clutch grabbing.

Do yourself a favor -- turn off the Hill Assist and take the car to a parking lot. Just spend an hour clutching the car around the parking lot. Get a real feel for the clutch threshold. That is essential for smooth operation of standard shift -- the rest is just hand-eye coordination :)
 

·
Registered
2020 Subaru WRX STI Base WR Blue
Joined
·
3 Posts
Second on the hill assist, I've been driving manual only for the last few years and that thing made me stall who know how many times before I turned it off.

I definitely agree with the empty parking lot and practice getting the car going with the clutch only, no gas so you can get a feel for the bite point.

Once you get some practice you can add in the gas for smooth take offs, getting into first seems to be the hardest part about this car for me because it's so jerky and definitely feels like it wants to stall if you let off too quickly without enough gas.

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Did you read the ECU codes?

Stalling won't "kill" the battery, but not regularly tending will reduce the battery capacity. Since you let the car sit for more than a year, I imagine the new battery was necessary. Keep it on a tender.

For what it's worth, these cars have a steep learning curve for a standard shift. I have been driving standard for 20 years and have only daily driven an automatic for a short period during those 20 years. I still stall on occasion with my 2015 STI, more than any other car, particularly when starting on an incline and with steering at full lock. These cars have wide tires and high caster and so they have a lot of "resistance" when starting from full steering lock. The hill assist does not do any favors -- it kills the sensation of a clutch grabbing.

Do yourself a favor -- turn off the Hill Assist and take the car to a parking lot. Just spend an hour clutching the car around the parking lot. Get a real feel for the clutch threshold. That is essential for smooth operation of standard shift -- the rest is just hand-eye coordination :)
Not sure where're the ECU codes tho:p

Will it be okay if I only drive it twice a week for now, or that's not considered as regularly tending?

I'll try turning off the Hill Assist and see if that helps, just hope all these stalling & jerking that I've been doing doesn't damage the car:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Second on the hill assist, I've been driving manual only for the last few years and that thing made me stall who know how many times before I turned it off.

I definitely agree with the empty parking lot and practice getting the car going with the clutch only, no gas so you can get a feel for the bite point.

Once you get some practice you can add in the gas for smooth take offs, getting into first seems to be the hardest part about this car for me because it's so jerky and definitely feels like it wants to stall if you let off too quickly without enough gas.

Good luck
I actually never tried going with the clutch only without gas, it stalled so often on the 1st gear when we were practicing in the empty parking lot then my friends told me to hit the gas hard so I can avoid stalling. Because they said I probably let got of the clutch too quick, so I have to hit the gas to keep it going. I feel like it did get better, but I still don't get the bite point of it. I just hit the gas even before I let go of the clutch, and it jerks every time when I do that :p

No doubt that 1st gear is the hardest part for me, I even stalled after a full stop during traffic on the highway, geez! It's nerve-racking with all the honking behind, which makes me so frustrated and felt like maybe I'm not good enough for a stick shift...:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Going clutch only lets you get a good feeling for where the clutch starts to grab. I also noticed for smooth shifts into 2nd-6th you don't really push the gas & let out the clutch at the same time it's more like leading with the clutch & following with the gas.

Your frustration level plays into learning it too. Regardless if you stall or not being relaxed helps you not rush through the movements.

If it snows where you live practicing in the snow helps some.

There is S, S# & I modes for the accelerator the I setting may be best to learn. When I borrowed my moms van she was having a hard time with S but no problem with I as long as she didn't accidentally lock the diffs instead.
 

·
Registered
2020 Subaru WRX STI Base WR Blue
Joined
·
3 Posts
Just takes practice, I only have 1k miles on my STI so far and I definitely feel smoother than when I first started. Over time you'll develop a feel for the bite point and will be able to give it just the right amount of gas while releasing the clutch to take off smoothly.

Only thing about giving it a lot of has to get going is you'll definitely be getting those jerky movements if you let off too quickly and too high of an RPM, and possibly increase clutch wear depending how long you slip it as well. Plus once you turn off hill assist you'll probably notice the bite point more easily and I noticed the car didn't seem as stall prone so maybe you won't feel the need for all the extra gas on takeoff.
 

·
Æternum
Joined
·
20,658 Posts
Frankly, your friend is wrong.

Feeding in throttle is something that should come only after you have learned your clutch engagement.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,434 Posts
Don't over complicate the process. The engine will build a lot of rpm fast without load so small movements of your gas pedal make the difference.

The secret is releasing the clutch to the catch point then slowly and steadily adding throttle as the clutch comes out. The longer you drive it the more comfortable you get with it the smoother and faster that exchange happens.

Things that are 100% no bueno.

Full throttle clutch dump.

Partial clutch engagement flat foot throttle.

Smashing the throttle trying to prevent a stall, push the clutch pedal a bit, then add a small amount of throttle.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Vikz

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I am going to offer that you might be better off getting a training class. Let someone teach you how to do this. I know that I had a steep learning curve on my first clutch vehicle. Although the transmissions and clutches have improved since that time, there is still a learning curve. As been noted, the WRX / WRX STi are not the easiest manuals to learn on. Theirs is a bit of a lurch and stall curve. Professional instruction may save you a clutch and help you with your nerves.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Vikz

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Going clutch only lets you get a good feeling for where the clutch starts to grab. I also noticed for smooth shifts into 2nd-6th you don't really push the gas & let out the clutch at the same time it's more like leading with the clutch & following with the gas.

Your frustration level plays into learning it too. Regardless if you stall or not being relaxed helps you not rush through the movements.

If it snows where you live practicing in the snow helps some.

There is S, S# & I modes for the accelerator the I setting may be best to learn. When I borrowed my moms van she was having a hard time with S but no problem with I as long as she didn't accidentally lock the diffs instead.
My friends were telling me to lead with the clutch first & follow with the gas too, but I couldn't get the grab & it stalled so many times!

I know that my frustration level is not doing good for me on learning, but I just couldn't help it:(

I'm in NYC, it snows less in these last couple years. I hope I'll be good with it before this winter because I don't think it will snow anytime soon here.

I think I have it on the S mode, I'll change it to I next time when I drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Just takes practice, I only have 1k miles on my STI so far and I definitely feel smoother than when I first started. Over time you'll develop a feel for the bite point and will be able to give it just the right amount of gas while releasing the clutch to take off smoothly.

Only thing about giving it a lot of has to get going is you'll definitely be getting those jerky movements if you let off too quickly and too high of an RPM, and possibly increase clutch wear depending how long you slip it as well. Plus once you turn off hill assist you'll probably notice the bite point more easily and I noticed the car didn't seem as stall prone so maybe you won't feel the need for all the extra gas on takeoff.
I think I've only took off smoothly less than five times since the beginning till now, lol:LOL:

I'll come back to update on how it goes after turning off the hill assist.

Thanks a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Frankly, your friend is wrong.

Feeding in throttle is something that should come only after you have learned your clutch engagement.
I think they got frustrated with all the stalling I did, so they asked me to just feed in throttle even I didn't feel the clutch engagement... :unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Don't over complicate the process. The engine will build a lot of rpm fast without load so small movements of your gas pedal make the difference.

The secret is releasing the clutch to the catch point then slowly and steadily adding throttle as the clutch comes out. The longer you drive it the more comfortable you get with it the smoother and faster that exchange happens.

Things that are 100% no bueno.

Full throttle clutch dump.

Partial clutch engagement flat foot throttle.

Smashing the throttle trying to prevent a stall, push the clutch pedal a bit, then add a small amount of throttle.
I think I've been doing all those 100% no bueno things :oops:
 

·
Æternum
Joined
·
20,658 Posts
You really need to disable the hill assist -- it is not helping things.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Vikz

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I am going to offer that you might be better off getting a training class. Let someone teach you how to do this. I know that I had a steep learning curve on my first clutch vehicle. Although the transmissions and clutches have improved since that time, there is still a learning curve. As been noted, the WRX / WRX STi are not the easiest manuals to learn on. Theirs is a bit of a lurch and stall curve. Professional instruction may save you a clutch and help you with your nerves.
That what I think too, I think it will help bringing my confident level back up too:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Hi Everyone,

Not sure how to bring this thread back up to everyone, hope this will do.
326309


I did try to go in the I mode, it did seem batter on stalling, but it kicked back into S mode when I was on highway on 5th gear. Then, I was not able to switch it back anymore, even after I restarted the car... Now, the Check Engine light is on, did I do some bad damage on the car?

Very concerned...:(
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,434 Posts
Limp it to an auto parts store and have them scan the code if you don't already have a scan tool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Stupid Questions (my specialty): Have you looked into professional assistance?

You wouldn't happen to have an older friend (5 - 6 decades walking this rock) that has driving a manual experience? Someone older may even have experience with non-synchromesh transmissions. They might be able to help you get a handle on it, too.

Yea, yea 49 Flatbed Chevy duely with a 3 speed on the floor. Hay truck, pulling the hay wagon in the field. I wasn't big / strong enough to buck the bales.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top