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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a 2012 STi 5 hatch on order, and something keeps niggling at me. Now, I loved the car when I test drove it, except for one issue. Below 4500 rpms, the car felt a little sluggish. (I'm coming from a 330 BMW, as a point of reference.) I am wondering what are some things I can do (possible mods, I guess) that might help lower the torque curve a bit, so that the power comes on at lower rpms?

I'd like to stick with simple (inexpensive) things, as opposed to a new turbo or something like that.

Thanks!
 

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That's a tough one. You're talking about comparing a 2.5L with low compression (8.2:1) AWD and a huge exhaust restriction to a NA RWD car with higher compression ratio. You can work on some breathing mods to decrease the restriction, but you'll still be limited by the displacement, AWD (twice the driveline mass), and turbocharger.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's a tough one. You're talking about comparing a 2.5L with low compression (8.2:1) AWD and a huge exhaust restriction to a NA RWD car with higher compression ratio. You can work on some breathing mods to decrease the restriction, but you'll still be limited by the displacement, AWD (twice the driveline mass), and turbocharger.
Very good points, and very true. I did forget to say my 330 is the xi model (AWD), but your point is still valid.
 

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Lando Calrissian
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Turbo Back Exhaust.... replace the exhaust from the turbo flange all the way back to the tailpipe with a higher flowing model... this with a professional tune (or an over the shelf map from the likes of Cobb) will increase performance quite a bit.

another option though....as I am a smart a$$...try downshifting :p
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Turbo Back Exhaust.... replace the exhaust from the turbo flange all the way back to the tailpipe with a higher flowing model... this with a professional tune (or an over the shelf map from the likes of Cobb) will increase performance quite a bit.

another option though....as I am a smart a$$...try downshifting :p
Okay, I probably deserve this comment. That isn't always an option, unless I wind up the car in every gear, which is always an option! :)
 

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Wants to Sell His Honyota Civilander..Any Takers?
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Okay, I probably deserve this comment. That isn't always an option, unless I wind up the car in every gear, which is always an option! :)
Don't be overly afraid of the revs. It's true the powerband sits higher where boost comes in, but there is no reason you can't keep this motor on the edge of that range. Not to say you should be running at 5000 all the time, but I find when I'm not cruising, that I keep it around 3000 and the power is very close at hand.
 

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Don't be overly afraid of the revs. It's true the powerband sits higher where boost comes in, but there is no reason you can't keep this motor on the edge of that range. Not to say you should be running at 5000 all the time, but I find when I'm not cruising, that I keep it around 3000 and the power is very close at hand.
I cruise right around the same range, power is on demand if needed.
 

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Don't be overly afraid of the revs. It's true the powerband sits higher where boost comes in, but there is no reason you can't keep this motor on the edge of that range. Not to say you should be running at 5000 all the time, but I find when I'm not cruising, that I keep it around 3000 and the power is very close at hand.
Ha. At 3000 RPMs the powerband is still 1000 RPMs away for me :p
 

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Super Moderator (Actually a SuperSpy)
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Below 4500 rpms, the car felt a little sluggish. (I'm coming from a 330 BMW, as a point of reference.)
Don't buy or do anything yet.

Get the car, let it break in, and then compare the two once you are used to the new car.

Compared to a modern STi your BMW is a mobile chicane, even at low RPM.
 

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Lando Calrissian
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some would say yes..... others would say 6spd is only for staying in the power-band in situations like lots of twisty turns where shifting is done a lot.....others would say give me a 4spd so I don't havbe to shift every 4 seconds.... I think it all depends on what type of driving you do, where you drive, and how often you want to use your left leg
 

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A simple and effective mod is the Cobb access port. It does not make the power come on sooner but evens it out a lot in my opinion. Makes the car feel a lot faster and gets rid of that hick up around 3500 rpm. I just installed it on my 2011 STI and have been enjoying the new power every time I drive.
CobbTuning.com - '08-'12 STI AccessPORT
 

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Good power should be coming in at 3000rpm and peak torque should be around 3500rpm . When you test drove the STi did you put the SI drive in sport sharp? If not you was on a weaker map with a slower throttle response.
This is the most important question which has gone unanswered. The car has a night and day difference between S and S#. I don't know why they even put the S setting in a car like an STI. Well I do, but the answer is pure marketing spin which is it makes the car get better gas mileage.

The first thing I do when I start the car is to put it in S#. I wish there was a way to leave it there permanently but unfortunately not. After this, getting a sedan and a tune instead of the wagon is the way to go. The sedan has a higher flowing cat than the wagon does so you get better results out of stage 1 than you do on the wagon. You used to have to replace the DP to be able to get a really good power increase in the older STI models, and still do in the wagon, but the high flow cat in the sedan has made all the difference and just a tune gives you almost double the power boost it used to on the older sedans.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good power should be coming in at 3000rpm and peak torque should be around 3500rpm . When you test drove the STi did you put the SI drive in sport sharp? If not you was on a weaker map with a slower throttle response.
Yes, I was in sport sharp. (My wife has a 2008 Outback XT, so I was already familiar with the different settings.) Just to clarify, I did have some power below 4500 rpms, but it felt like I really needed to downshift - every time- if I needed some significant power and the rpms were below 4000-4500 rpms. I don't mind downshifting -obviously- but I would prefer if I had a bit more power accessible without the rpms at 4500 or higher.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This is the most important question which has gone unanswered. The car has a night and day difference between S and S#. I don't know why they even put the S setting in a car like an STI. Well I do, but the answer is pure marketing spin which is it makes the car get better gas mileage.

The first thing I do when I start the car is to put it in S#. I wish there was a way to leave it there permanently but unfortunately not. After this, getting a sedan and a tune instead of the wagon is the way to go. The sedan has a higher flowing cat than the wagon does so you get better results out of stage 1 than you do on the wagon. You used to have to replace the DP to be able to get a really good power increase in the older STI models, and still do in the wagon, but the high flow cat in the sedan has made all the difference and just a tune gives you almost double the power boost it used to on the older sedans.
Bummer, I basically HAVE to get a hatchback as we have dogs and I'm a drummer. I need the space for both of those things.
 
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