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So I?ve had my WRX for a couple weeks now. I?m creeping on about 1000 miles. I want to do my first oil change soon. I drive this car HARD. I?ve already staged 1 it and soon to come stage 2. Any oil recommendations?
 

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Any oil recommendations?
Recommendations are useless. Only data matter. Go to Bob Is The Oil Guy and look over data. Then decide. Don't waste your time listening to philosophers, fans, and salesmen. Data.
 

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I changed mine at 500 and again at 1000 after break in. It's the best that you can do and it's cheap.

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There's no such thing as a "performance" oil change, and if you've already been "driving your car HARD" and it's not at 1000 miles you should probably trade it in on another one because if you'd read your owners manual, it has a very clearly stated break in procedure for the life and longevity of the engine.
 

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There's no such thing as a "performance" oil change, and if you've already been "driving your car HARD" and it's not at 1000 miles you should probably trade it in on another one because if you'd read your owners manual, it has a very clearly stated break in procedure for the life and longevity of the engine.
Correct.

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SD_GR said:
Recommendations are useless. Only data matter. Go to Bob Is The Oil Guy and look over data. Then decide. Don't waste your time listening to philosophers, fans, and salesmen. Data.
Spiros dropping knowledge, as per usual...

WRX John said:
I always change my oil and filter on my new cars at 500 miles.

And yes, we are back at this topic again, with neither side giving an inch.
I'm a member of the "other camp", which doesn't believe in premature oil change intervals.


If you're not utilizing your own UOA, you need to understand the basics of how oil works to make an informed decision...

Do you understand how to choose the proper oil weight for the conditions you're driving? If not, that's the first place to start. The factory recommended 5W30 is not the best oil in all situations; some areas would be better with different weights.

Filtration is important, so make sure you choose the proper oil filter. If you don't use an OE filter, make sure that you choose one that has the proper bypass specs, or one that's still suitable.

If you're running a very short OCI (changing 1000 miles into the "standard" OCI), if you use a quality engine oil, you should be fine, assuming you've chosen the proper weight and filter.

If you don't understand enough about oil weight and filter specifications, replace with OE oil / filter, because you're wasting your money anyway...


If you're really concerned with what's "best" for your vehicle, start performing UOAs when you change your oil. This will give you scientific data to talk about how the oil and filter are working on your vehicle. Once you've figured out the proper oil and OCI, you can get away with having a UOA done every two or three changes (as a "spot check"), but until you've gotten to that point, you should spend the money every change.
 

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I am in my own unique camp and believe in extending the OCI beyond the factory recommendation and never having oil analysis done. It works for me. But I drive like a grandpa and like Genesee Cream Ale, so don't do oil the way I do.....
 

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"Maybe try to not give extremely outlandish information to people. Everybody knows that you should break your engine in according to the manual..but telling somebody they might as well trade in a new car could create false knowledge"

Whoever left that as a reputation comment regarding my last post, maybe you should think about it. If they SHOULDNT get rid of the car, why is there a break in procedure at all? Why not just redline it off the lot if it's not going to negatively effect the car in any way, shape, or form?

In 2 years when this car is blown up, and the owner is asking for help, everyone is going to ask him 2 or 3 different things. First being mods, but one of them is likely going to be if he followed break in.

So, my apologies for "spreading false knowledge" that wasn't actually knowledge at all, but my personal opinion.

If I'd driven the hell out of my car only to find out I was supposed to be babying it or risking damage, I would rather trade it in than wonder when and if something is going to fail with it, and do it the right way the next time.

And lastly, the next time you have an issue with something a person says, maybe respond to their post before you attempt to negatively effect their forum reputation.
 

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That car won't make it two years

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When asked about oil, my engine builder would say "Use whatever you can get for free." He'd tested oils on the dyno and found that they didn't make any difference to horsepower.

That said, I used to run Red Line synthetic because I found that it left minimal ash on the back sides of the exhaust valves compared to conventional oils like Valvoline. Since I freshened the valves after every weekend I could see this buildup regularly and I felt that it couldn't be doing exhaust gas flow any good. So I preferred less to more.

I wouldn't worry about the ash on a street car motor, though. It is a self-limiting thing. The ash insulates the valve so when it gets to a certain thickness the building of ash stops. When I have torn down street motors it is definitely there but it is not a big deal. In racing a tenth of a second is a big deal so I worried about stuff like the ash. In grocery-getters, not so much.
 

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racer70 said:
When asked about oil, my engine builder would say "Use whatever you can get for free." He'd tested oils on the dyno and found that they didn't make any difference to horsepower.
Unless the oil is too heavy and causing a restriction on something like the crankshaft, it's not going to cause an issue on the dyno. Where you run into an issue is when it's being operated outside the temperature range, and it starts to break down. If all you care about are ¼-mile stretches, your oil never gets hot enough to see that. If you do prolonged spirited driving, the oil temperatures could shoot up and cause issues.
 

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That car won't make it two years

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My thoughts exactly.

OP, are you trolling? Or do you work for Road & Track and this is some crazy test you're running? No break-in, driving "HARD" on a Stage 1 brand new out the gate... I feel like me and the mad scientist are gonna have to rip apart the block to replace the piston rings you fried soon.
 

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... If you do prolonged spirited driving, the oil temperatures could shoot up and cause issues.
Seems unlikely unless you have a street car actually on a race track. "Spirited driving" on the street is unlikely to be an issue IMO. Any proper race car will have sufficient oil cooling, so there it is a non-issue.
 

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Seems unlikely unless you have a street car actually on a race track. "Spirited driving" on the street is unlikely to be an issue IMO. Any proper race car will have sufficient oil cooling, so there it is a non-issue.
Are you kidding? People track their daily drivers all the time.

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racer70 said:
Seems unlikely unless you have a street car actually on a race track. "Spirited driving" on the street is unlikely to be an issue IMO. Any proper race car will have sufficient oil cooling, so there it is a non-issue.
I see oil temperatures above 212°F/100°C (the "hot" rating of an oil weight) on a regular basis when driving to/from work. That's not pushing the car.

That's one of the reasons that Shell Rotella T6 5W40 (instead of the factory 5W30 recommendation) is so popular in the Subaru world.
 
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