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Thinking Man's Engine
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How to change your bulbs

So you got these bulbs laying around, and wondered how to do it.....

Headlights (9007)
1.Open the hood (duh)

2. Pick a side and start there.

3. For the headlamps (9007), on the connector, there's a serrated edge (on top), squeeze it, and pull out the connecor.

4. Unscrew the retainer (the big black plastic thing) and remove the bulb.

5. Insert new bulb (may be a good idea to clean the bulb with some rubbing alcohol) and put everything back together.

Fog (H3)
1. Remove three screws (but not the adjuster). use a 10mm socket with a 6" extension or a Phillips screwdriver (I use a 10mm socket, Jim uses a screwdriver)

2. Remove the foglight assembly from the bumper

3. At the back remove the cap of the foglight housing and you'll see the bulb.

4. Push in the metal spring and rotate it out of the way

5. Remove the old H3 bulb, noting its orientation (rectangular notch and half circular notch)

6. Pull on the wiring connector to remove male disconnect of the fog bulb

7. Install new bulb, and lock it into place with the spring retaining clip.

8. Shove the male connector in (angle it in)

9. Reassemble carefully

Turn signals (1156)
1. Loosen the cap of the connector (it's very tight) then twist out the bulb and reinstall everything.

haven't got to the parking lights (or those europeans call it "city lights") yet.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess you got either a Raybrig or Polarg bulb. One of the uses "T10", as their part number.

The common nomenclature for the wedge bulbs are

168 (5W)
194 (3.5)

If in Europe, W5W.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
beastcivic said:
Tan, how come you know so much intimate detail of the WRX when you have a VW? (not complaining... just wondering)
Here's the quick story:

Last Saturday, I was bored and driving all around, stopped by PlatinumWRX's house. Asked him how he liked the PIAA Superwhite.

To my suprise, he didn't install them yet, they looked too "hard" to do (compared to the Link ECU). He had his hood up earlier, took a quick look, so I knew they weren't that hard to do (because my old car had 9004 bulbs, same socket).

10 minutes later, finished up the headlights (trying to figure out how to remove the connector plug, since it was slightly different from my old car, and my parents Caravan, and Jimi removed the the holder also with the connector plug still attached.

Then we did the fog lights, straight-forward to do.

I was curious about the turn signals, and did it real quick.


The real reason, let's say I'm a car-enthusiast who appreciates most cars instead of bad mouthing every car but the WRX (like a certain someone that drives a competitor's car for the same price point).

You guys have it easy compared to replacing the H7's in my Golf.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The passenger side, you remove the air duct out of your way.

Jim did the passenger side after I instructed him how to do it, and he definitely has bigger hands than me. The screw on holder of the bulb housing does get in the way also.,
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What are my light bulbs?

From www.sylvania.com/auto/carapp/

High & low beam headlamp
Part number = 9007


Upgrade Part Number = 9007ST
"Silverstar High Performance Halogen Upgrade - Whitest, Brightest, 100% Street Legal"

Upgrade Part Number = 9007CB
Cool Blue Halogen Upgrade - White Hot; Super Cool; 100% Street Legal

Upgrade Part Number = 9007XV
XtraVision Halogen Upgrade - Up to 20% Brighter than standard

Upgrade Part Number = 9007LL
Long Life Halogen Upgrade - Lasts 3x longer




Parking light
Part number = 168


Front turn signal
Part number = 1156
Upgrade Part Number = 1156LL
Long Life Upgrade - Up to twice the life of the standard lamp


Tail light
Part number = 7443


Stop light
Part number = 7440

Part number = 7443


High mount stop light
Part number = 912 (Wagon)

Part number = 921 (Sedan)
Upgrade Part Number = 921LL
Long Life Upgrade - Up to twice the life of the standard lamp


Fog/Driving light
Part number = H3-55W


License plate
Part number = 168


Back up light
Part number = 7440


Front sidemarker
Part number = 168


Rear sidemarker
Part number = 168


Ash tray
Part number = 74


Map light
Part number = 168


Dome light
Part number = DE3175


Trunk/Cargo area
Part number = 912 (Sedan)

Part number = 921 (Wagon)
Upgrade Part Number = 921LL
Long Life Upgrade - Up to twice the life of the standard lamp
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
junaitari said:
Tan, where do you find all this stuff? Seems like you're always putting good info out there. Thanks!!
See the link I posted above.....


Oh yeah....

Difference between 168 & 194? Both peanut (wedge) are virtually identical except:

168: 5 watts
194: 3.5 watts
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Myths and some Science of Light bulbs

Quick post about myths of light bulbs, in particular headlight and fog lighting.

The main motivation is the market of halogen bulbs to mimic true HID (High Intensity Discharge, Xenon) systems.

Myth 1:They are brighter than stock halogens
a. Put easy put it, they are not. White light is all the visible (to the human eye) wavelengths together.

b. In order to produce the "HID" like qualities, manufacturers typically utilize a coating or tinting of the glass.

c. This tint or coating is a Filter. Filters well, to put it in laymen's terms, separate things and let only certains items pass. In lighting terms, it will output only the specific wavelength it was designed for....some sort of blue color (most on the market). Of course with coatings, there will be voids or imperfections (coatings people call this "holidays") were the light isn't filtered.

d. Thus you actually reduce the light output. But our perception makes us think it's brighter.


Myth 2:Higher Color Temperature is better
http://www.piaausa.com/glossary.html has a nice color temperature chart

a. See myth one. White light coming from regular halogen bulbs is approximately 3200°K. Sunlight in the the neighborhood of low 5000°K. True HID systems are typically 4300°K. Halogen lighting is a different mechanism than HID (heated resistor versus arcing). Again see myth one.

b. Color Temperature is not directly associated with output, measured in lumens. So due to myth one, you get reduced lighting.

Myth 3:55/65 W -> 100/110W, PIAA marketing for Superwhites
a. Anyone hear of the Laws of Thermodynamics? There is no such thing as a "Perpetual Motion Machine"

b. Energy in = Energy out. Most of the energy out is heat. Someone said "Energy cannot be created nor be destroyed".

Myth 4:High Wattage bulbs are safe to use
a. Since filters reduce light output, what do manufacturers do to compensate? Increase the power.

b. Fine and dandy, put the extra heat generated, may (I suffered this before) damage the immediate wiring and the headlight connector. Some say it will damage the polycarbonate lens (I don't know since my old car used a glass len). And it may also damage the electrical system (Done that before using 50 watt reverse bulbs sold at an auto parts store). Many have hooked up relays to compensate. The connectors aren't readily available at the local Pep Boys or radio shack.


Myth 5:The package says Xenon
Halogen lighting is tungsten filament and mostly Krypton gas. Some manufacturers add a trace amount of Xenon gas, just to advertise "Xenon", truth in advertising at least.


Myth 6:Overall they perform better in all weather conditions
Driving from personal experience, yes they seem a little better when the road is dry, but when the weather becomes foul (or fresh asphalt), much of the light is absorbed into the black asphalt....so you'll be driving blind. Some suggest the blue wavelength refracts and reflects more readily also.


-----------------------------

Well if you want the look, by all means.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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3,003 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just avoid the 80/100W bulbs, and other higher wattage bulbs.

I have tried Sylvania XtraVisions in the past, and I do recommend them.

The Sylvania Silverstars are a decent alternative to PIAA superwhites (not nearly as costly), as are Cool Blue/Phillips BlueVision/GE Super Blue (lighter tint than Silverstars, are are still yellow during the day time).

I'm using a bulb imported from Europe (though it's not DOT approved), Phillips VisionPlus. Though for the North American spec WRX, they are not available.

In the lighting forum of VwVortex.com, all the regulars recommend Phillips VisionPlus (though many forget they are not available in 9007 for the NA Spec Jetta), which is a non-tinted bulb. Whenever someone brings up a fake HID bulb, people get flamed way too quickly (they don't respect people who really want the look)

Overall Performance is non-tinted for headlights.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The only problem I can forsee involves the police.

Any auxilary mounted lights, whether it's driving lights or pencil beam (designed for use with high beams) are still considered to be fog lights.

I've in the past have ran driving lights with low beams (aim the driving lights down just a bit), without any problems from the boys in blue.

The problem is, running the stock fogs with the pencil beams...you might get a ticket for too many light operating in the front.

Likewise you can't run the pencil beams with the high beams.
 

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Thinking Man's Engine
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
RLsChMiDt said:
Sorry I skimmed this over, but I am in physics this year. So what you're saying is that buying a new bulb is worthless? I understand what a filter is, and I understand that we can only see certain frequencies of light...but say I bought a Silverstar...would I notice an improvement?
The thing is...the tint allows certain frequencies to pass through...all the yellow and crap don't. THe output light is gives us the impression of it being brighter, when it's really not necessarily true. It's really merely for looks...everyone likes that look...including me.

Likewise yellow fog bulbs have decreased output...but for foul weather visibility it is an improvement.
 
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