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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am talking about everything here. I want to know exactly how to setup a WRX to be a drifting monster. I understand that it is not as easy to do in our cars as the classic drifting wonders like the AE86 and Silvia, but I was just wondering if anybody out there had any idea how to setup a WRX for drifting. I am talking about everything, wheels, tires, sway bars, ALK, camber, toe, caster, ride height, spring rate, and anything else I forgot. I know most of the basics but I want to hear your opinions and/or experiences. As far as how to do a drift once you get the proper setup, well I have done my research on that and done quite a bit of practicing as well (my poor tires!) so lets try and keep this setup related only.

Even if I or someone else does not do this setup this thread will serve as a good reference for suspension and suspension setups.

thanks

-joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, basically, this is a drift setup.....

-Huge front camber, -6 or 7 degrees, less in the back so your tired wear evenly
-Very tight rear end, very loose front end
-Bald tired on the back, sticky tired up front
-Light crappy wheels
-Lowered but not very low

The problem is, that is the setup that they use on the said AE86s, Silvias, etc, I was just wondering about things specific to the WRX.

The biggest disadvantage we have is that the proper way to drift is to knife the clutch or to e-brake, two things that are not very healthy for the drivetrain on a WRX.

-joe
 

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I would say having a neutral handling car would be what you are after, as opposed to making the rear sway REALLY stiff compared to the front.

Once the car is neutral from the swaybar perspective, I'd say you'd want zero or slightly positive camber, with cheap tires (read, not too sticky). I'm guessing that really stiff swaybars that produced neutral handling would actually cause the car to hardly lean, thus making the suspension work more. If you had a fairly stiff suspension, I would think that forces exhurted on the tires would be at more of an angle (outward to the curve). This would cause the cheap tires, with positive camber to be easily overcome and thus induce a slide.

I'm by no means an expert, but figured I'd chime in. Take that for what it's worth, probably $0.00001 :)

Edit: just read you response, so I think I might have the camber issue backwards. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You need the crazy front negative camber and sticky tires to be able to hold traction up front, so when you point it where you want to go, it will hold that line and go there.

I think I might get some Legacy GT wheels with some really cruddy tires (if the belts are showing then I will have sparks just like the real drifters) and see if I can do it.

Keep the sugestions coming.

-joe
 

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Good sticky rubber up front, snows in the back should do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any reason you recommend snows? Would they be better than any old balding tire?

-joe
 

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Yeah, they offer almost no grip on dry pavement. Balding S-03s are still pretty damn sticky. In fact, high-performance tires have their most grip when the tread gets pretty thin. Many racers "shave" their tires for better grip in a race.

Snows are definitely better on dry pavement as they get thin since the tread blocks are more stable.

You might want to try some high-mileage tires. Tires that are warranted for like 70,000 miles or something are made rock-hard so that they'll last that long. The result is very low grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Is it the tread pattern or the density of the compound at work here?

-joe
 

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Yeah, compound and pattern are everything. Ultra-high perfomance tires are soft with big stable tread blocks. The compund grips well when hot and the blocks stay in shape. When shaved or worn down the blocks are even more stable. WHen they go completely bald, the compound is a bit too hard and they go off a little, but this is partially offset by the increased contact area of a "slick"

Racing slicks are very soft, but with no cuts the whole thing stays stable. But they're a bit too stable when cold so they need some heat in them so they can conform to the pavement and grip.

High-mileage compounds are rock hard to last and therefore have no grip.

Snow compounds are way soft and cut up into small siped blocks. On dry pavement the blocks are too soft and lay over, again giving very poor grip. Plus they overheat really easily as the compound is designed to stay soft when cold.
 

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I'm gonna chime in for informational purposes. My experience is that with lift throttle oversteer and power understeer, the car can be forced to drift by thottle modulation. So . . .

1. Isn't this drift, i.e. am I misidentifying what is happening through a turn?

2. If not, is drift even BETTER that what I have!!!?
 

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NJwrbT-WRX said:
The biggest disadvantage we have is that the proper way to drift is to knife the clutch or to e-brake, two things that are not very healthy for the drivetrain on a WRX.

-joe
Those are techniques to drift, but not the only ways to drift. Nor are those the so called "proper" ways either....particularly stabbing the clutch.
 

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Please review the last sentence of the first paragraph of the first post in this thread. Joe requested we leave driving technique out of this discussion.
 

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I can certainly understand that this thread is not about driving technique. If we are discussing various set ups for drifting, it is inevitable that we will discuss set ups with respect to how one would induce a drift with each set up. In other words, I don't see how we can talk about drifting (a driving technique) without at least some mention (albeit for reference purposes only) of what would induce a drift with a certain set up.
 

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AWD throws a monkey wrench in the mix but here's my best guess:

frt toe:
-.5/-1.0 degrees... Will maximize turn-in bite if the rex has a conventional 18/20 deegre turn in at 20 degrees. Same setup you'd use on a auto-x'er.

rear toe:
+.5/+1.0 degrees, maybe even a little more toe in than that.

front camber: -2/-3 degrees. I hate huge camber & the way it makes a car steer

rear camber:
the big g00se egg.. zero

Front caster: perhaps the most important one. A whopping 7 to 8 degrees positive.

front swaybar:
remove it :)

rear swaybar:
HUUUUUGE.

about 30 psi front tire pressure & 45 rear.

Thinking about this I was basically envisioning a late model dirttrack car that had to turn left & right.

I'm sure I just concocted the recipe though for trailing throttle oversteer that would make a 911 seem like tercel in comparison.

personally I'd affix a solid driveshaft & remove the front axles :)

j.p.
 

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Id swap the tire pess. around more front then rear, induce the rears to slip over on the sidewall. Just like the front 92s on my car, they slide like a monster.
 

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I know what you're talking about trypsin, but in my experience, under-inflated tires tend to behave like slinkys when they are sliding. Drift, grip, drift, grip: making a stable attitude really hard to maintain.

every stock wrx I've driven understeers like a pig without power application. Low speeds are particularly bad.

j.p.
 

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wrx drifting

I've managed to drift my wrx a few times, most if not all not on purpose but I've gathered this:

A: you definitely do not need traction in the fron compared to the back. in fact, you don't want traction anywhere.
Every time I've drifted all wheels are spinning and I'm actually not countersteering that much.

B: Everytime it has happened (and I say happened because it never happens when I want it) is when I'm going ove 40 miles an hr. or, I've given it a lot of power turned the car sharply and I'm on some sort of soft surface (dirt, gravel, etc)

I've also hace this to say:
When I first got the car stock, it would understeer like hell.
I have since changed a few things and noticed the following:

A:tein superstreet coilovers (4 corners) dropped just 1 inch.
settings 15 in front, 12 on back
and cobb swaybars medium setting.
brand new yokohamas

Result: car definitely felt more prone to oversteer at the limits compared to before making me feel not too confident when driving hard. still very neutral in handling tho

B: coilovers in all corners
swaybars set to soft setting.

result:
car now felt more prone to understeer at the limits. when driven hard around a bend, it would just push out a very slight bit. But definitely more neutral.

C: coilovers in back, stock struts in front with tein shortening springs on front.
swaybars set to soft.

result:
the car feels super neutral. it rocks sideways more tho.
it will oversteer when pushed to the very limit but for some reason I like this setup the best. (I had to take off the front coilovers because one busted, and had to send it to ger repaired. got it back, but now I don't know if I want to put them back on)

I'm trying to learn to drift too, but I think one has to learn to race first. Kinda like trying to learn to pole jump without knowing how to run first.

What I'm doing is, every night I drive down a canyon road I know has no traffic and drive as fast as it is safely possible. I tend to keep it civil in the straights and then just rip it in the bends. I try using toe heel downshifting and smooth transition from braking to throttle.
and when it rains I go to empty parking lots, take it to 40 miles an hr, turn in either direction and pull the handbrake and try to keep the car from turning beyond 90 degrees.
this is good practice for the steering and timing of the brake pull.

I'm by no means an expert but I think I'm going in the right direction. :)
 

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nice bump:rotfl:
 

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I've managed to drift my wrx a few times, most if not all not on purpose but I've gathered this:
What I'm doing is, every night I drive down a canyon road I know has no traffic and drive as fast as it is safely possible. I tend to keep it civil in the straights and then just rip it in the bends. I try using toe heel downshifting and smooth transition from braking to throttle.
and when it rains I go to empty parking lots, take it to 40 miles an hr, turn in either direction and pull the handbrake and try to keep the car from turning beyond 90 degrees.
this is good practice for the steering and timing of the brake pull.

I'm by no means an expert but I think I'm going in the right direction. :)

canyon Dr1fto for teh WiN!:rotfl:
 
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