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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about something recently. I've recently been using my gears to help slow me down, rather then pushing the clutch in and using just the brakes. But what I'm wondering is, can this hurt the clutch? Because isn't it sort of like gassing it while the clutch is half engaged. My usual method is to slowly let the clutch out watch the RPM's rise, when they just about stop rising I completely let it out. I don't just drop it out into the gear before it.

any advice would be great, thanks.
 

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It will cause accelerated clutch wear.

IMO, brakes are easier to change. I'm in the habit of clutching to slow down, but I'm trying to break that habit before I get my WRX. It's excellent to use when you need a super fast panic stop, but otherwise it probably isn't necessary.
 

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Cheeky Bastage!
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I think you are doing what I used to to, which is why my clutch started slipping at like 30k...You do not want to use the clutch pedal as a brake pedal. The correct method is to use engine braking, which I personally dont find it to "brake" that much, which is Rev-match down shifting and letting the engine spin off the speed. You do not want to use the energy generated from the transmission catching up to the engine to slow the engine because that is all put on the clutch.

Brake pads are cheaper than clutches.
 

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It probably wouldn't HURT the clutch, but it theoretically would decrease its lifespan.

I would recommend getting good at rev-matching by heel-toe or something similar, which is probably the best method from all standpoints: being ready to accelerate on short notice, longer lifespan than just letting the clutch out, decreases strain on the brakes/pads.
 

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I wouldn't let the clutch out slow like that, you wanna rev match (blip the throttle) and let it out normally. Sounds like you are riding the clutch doing it that way. It would be much better to rev match and let it out normally.
 

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Everyone can flame away on me for this one, but...

I always double-clutch and heel-toe match on the downshift. After the clutch is fully engaged, I use the engine to brake.
 

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+1. I throw it in neutral, get away from the clutch, and brake.
Your motor is at optimum volumetric efficiency when engine braking. That is, if you just throw it into neutral, your motor still idles as you brake. If you keep it in gear, the crank will spin from the momentum of the car and you actually use less fuel than idling. Therefore, you will save fuel by keeping your car in gear as long as possible.
 

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Your motor is at optimum volumetric efficiency when engine braking. That is, if you just throw it into neutral, your motor still idles as you brake. If you keep it in gear, the crank will spin from the momentum of the car and you actually use less fuel than idling. Therefore, you will save fuel by keeping your car in gear as long as possible.
This is true. Also I don't feel comfortable slowing down in neutral. Never know when you need to accelerate.
 

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Pro Manscaper
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Brake pads are cheaper than clutches.
Not according to the dealer he went to for brakes ;)


Rev-match. Blip the throttle upon slowing down, while the clutch is in, to get the revs up real quick, then slowly release off the clutch. That way it's engaging before it gets traction to cause more wear.
 

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This is true. Also I don't feel comfortable slowing down in neutral. Never know when you need to accelerate.
^^^This x100.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Got some very solid example of how to do it other ways with less harm to the parts. Thanks for the advice guys, I appreciate it. The only reason I was using the clutch and gears more recently is because my brakes were near shot and I was waiting until after the weekend to bring it in (parts needed to be ordered) so while I was driving it I wanted to use as little brake as possible. But now I know. And also, for the rev-match. I've done it before, but am surely a noob at it. Would I wait until the RPM's are at what I suspect is right before I begin pushing the shifter into gear, or do I push on the shifter, then blip the gas and let it pop in place?
 

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This is true. Also I don't feel comfortable slowing down in neutral. Never know when you need to accelerate.
Bah, you guys have it easy. If I'm in a gear and my RPMs are under 3K and I hit the gas... nothing.
 

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Everyone can flame away on me for this one, but...

I always double-clutch and heel-toe match on the downshift. After the clutch is fully engaged, I use the engine to brake.
I do that to some extent, bit I'll coast in neutral if I'm below 25mph or so. I always heel-toe around corners though, also when coming to a stop at above 30 mph. It makes the car feel so smooth and alive, as well as holding boost through tighter turns.
 

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Would I wait until the RPM's are at what I suspect is right before I begin pushing the shifter into gear, or do I push on the shifter, then blip the gas and let it pop in place?
Not wait. You rev the motor matching what the (respective gear you are downshifting into) motor would be at after downshifting then let the clutch out. It will become automatic after some time. If you are interested, double clutching puts a little less strain on the synchros and makes it easier (at least for me) to downshift. Here's how to do it:
1.) Push the clutch in
2.) Move the shifter into neutral
3.) let the clutch out
4.) Rev match
5.) Push the clutch in
6.) shift into gear
7.) Let the clutch out

After some getting-used-to, the process can be performed very swiftly. Also, since you'll be rev matching, you'll want to learn how to heel-toe. This involves depressing the brake with your right toes and using your heal (or ball) of your right foot to manipulate the throttle. This allows you to seamlessly downshift through corners so you're always in gear when exiting. This is essential if driving for sport:
1.) Attack the corner (brake as late as possible)
2.) Turn in, downshift before the apex (heel-toe)
3.) Power through the apex (in gear)
4.) Full throttle out of the corner.

With the 2.0L, there is so much Lag I have become accustomed to applying full throttle just before the apex so I build boost through the corner. You have the DCCD, so you can actually apply full power through the apex and let your electronic diff pull you through the corner. The EvoX's AYC is so trick that the driver can actually apply full throttle BEFORE the apex and not see an ounce of understeer. It's all in the car and how you drive it.
 
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to me rev matching is more of a feel of the rpms. i dont really look at them but if going from 4th to 3rd or anyother -1 gear just push in clutch, rev it a small bit then let off clutch. its all feel. and when going down 2 gears u have to rev more. just takes practice
 

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Got some very solid example of how to do it other ways with less harm to the parts. Thanks for the advice guys, I appreciate it. The only reason I was using the clutch and gears more recently is because my brakes were near shot and I was waiting until after the weekend to bring it in (parts needed to be ordered) so while I was driving it I wanted to use as little brake as possible. But now I know. And also, for the rev-match. I've done it before, but am surely a noob at it. Would I wait until the RPM's are at what I suspect is right before I begin pushing the shifter into gear, or do I push on the shifter, then blip the gas and let it pop in place?
If you have big, wide feet like I do, this is how to go from 4th gear going to 3rd:
Let off the gas
Left side of right foot on the brake, slowing you down
Clutch in
Shift
Throttle blip with the right side of your right foot, while still keeping the pressure on the brake
Clutch out when you think the RPMs are close, while still keeping the pressure on the brake

Lather, rinse, repeat.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not wait. You rev the motor matching what the (respective gear you are downshifting into) motor would be at after downshifting then let the clutch out. It will become automatic after some time. If you are interested, double clutching puts a little less strain on the synchros and makes it easier (at least for me) to downshift. Here's how to do it:
1.) Push the clutch in
2.) Move the shifter into neutral
3.) let the clutch out
4.) Rev match
5.) Push the clutch in
6.) shift into gear
7.) Let the clutch out

After some getting-used-to, the process can be performed very swiftly. Also, since you'll be rev matching, you'll want to learn how to heel-toe. This involves depressing the brake with your right toes and using your heal (or ball) of your right foot to manipulate the throttle. This allows you to seamlessly downshift through corners so you're always in gear when exiting. This is essential if driving for sport:
1.) Attack the corner (brake as late as possible)
2.) Turn in, downshift before the apex (heel-toe)
3.) Power through the apex (in gear)
4.) Full throttle out of the corner.

With the 2.0L, there is so much Lag I have become accustomed to applying full throttle just before the apex so I build boost through the corner. You have the DCCD, so you can actually apply full power through the apex and let your electronic diff pull you through the corner. The EvoX's AYC is so trick that the driver can actually apply full throttle BEFORE the apex and not see an ounce of understeer. It's all in the car and how you drive it.
Thanks for taking your time to type this. It will help me out, I need to learn good driving skills because I really want this car to last me. Not to change topics or anything, but if you got any info on the DCCD you can pass on to me it would be much appreciated. Sad to say it, but the only time I've fiddled with it was in the snow, I put it in manual and put it all the way on the opposite from 'lock' because I was trying to figure out what it actually did exactly, I think I noticed the back slide out further (I tested it in a office building parking lot, so I wasn't driving like an idiot in bad conditions on public roads.)
 

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but if you got any info on the DCCD you can pass on to me it would be much appreciated. Sad to say it, but the only time I've fiddled with it was in the snow, I put it in manual and put it all the way on the opposite from 'lock' because I was trying to figure out what it actually did exactly, I think I noticed the back slide out further (I tested it in a office building parking lot, so I wasn't driving like an idiot in bad conditions on public roads.)
You can change it manually, but mostly let the computer do the thinking for you: it is much faster and calculates more accurately than you could. Back in the old days of rallying (Group B and early Group N), the 4WD cars were all Viscous/Torsen couplers with manual locking mechanisms. The Porsche 959 was one of the first to receive a true electronic diff, which changed the game entirely. Nowadays, nearly all AWD cars contain some form of electronic differential -- Acura's SH-AWD, BMW's X-DRIVE, Honda's RT-AWD, Haldex Traction 2,3, and 4, etc. Subaru and Audi are among the select few that still use good ol' fashioned physical systems (though even Subaru has replaced the LSD on the WRX with an E-LSD). Moral of the story: the reason modern cars have adopted these electronic differentials is because they are faster and more accurate than any human input and requires less skill to be driven aggressively.

Still, I'm old fashioned. I would be much happier with a 20KG Viscous center Diff and manual locking mechanism than any modern electronic differential/yaw control.
 

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Not wait. You rev the motor matching what the (respective gear you are downshifting into) motor would be at after downshifting then let the clutch out. It will become automatic after some time. If you are interested, double clutching puts a little less strain on the synchros and makes it easier (at least for me) to downshift. Here's how to do it:
1.) Push the clutch in
2.) Move the shifter into neutral
3.) let the clutch out
4.) Rev match
5.) Push the clutch in
6.) shift into gear
7.) Let the clutch out

After some getting-used-to, the process can be performed very swiftly. Also, since you'll be rev matching, you'll want to learn how to heel-toe. This involves depressing the brake with your right toes and using your heal (or ball) of your right foot to manipulate the throttle. This allows you to seamlessly downshift through corners so you're always in gear when exiting. This is essential if driving for sport:
1.) Attack the corner (brake as late as possible)
2.) Turn in, downshift before the apex (heel-toe)
3.) Power through the apex (in gear)
4.) Full throttle out of the corner.

With the 2.0L, there is so much Lag I have become accustomed to applying full throttle just before the apex so I build boost through the corner. You have the DCCD, so you can actually apply full power through the apex and let your electronic diff pull you through the corner. The EvoX's AYC is so trick that the driver can actually apply full throttle BEFORE the apex and not see an ounce of understeer. It's all in the car and how you drive it.
I'm printing, laminating, and taping this to my visor.
 
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