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It is very difficult to get it perfect on that curved surface. It is much easier to get it closer to perfect if you remove the plastic bezel that surrounds the fog light so you can get at the edges better. A heat-gun is also very helpful to smooth it out. The reality though is that no one but you will ever be down there 6" in front of them inspecting your work, so I'd suggest not worrying about it. From normal distances no one will ever notice. They end up getting beat to hell with rocks and debris anyway, so you will get the opportunity to try again in a year or so.
 

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It is very difficult to get it perfect on that curved surface. It is much easier to get it closer to perfect if you remove the plastic bezel that surrounds the fog light so you can get at the edges better. A heat-gun is also very helpful to smooth it out. The reality though is that no one but you will ever be down there 6" in front of them inspecting your work, so I'd suggest not worrying about it. From normal distances no one will ever notice. They end up getting beat to hell with rocks and debris anyway, so you will get the opportunity to try again in a year or so.
This^ removing the fog light from the vehicle and applying makes it much easier. A heat gun also helps a lot.
 

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I recently put Lamin-X film on my headlights to help guard against chips and eventual clouding of the plastic. Starting with a nice clean surface always helps. Windex and microfiber cloths followed by some judicious use of an air hose to blow off any dust and water. I used a little soapy water (couple drops of dish soap into a small 8oz spray bottle) to keep my fingers wet to avoid getting my prints embedded into the adhesive and I used a heatgun to gently warm and stretch the film so that it conformed to the curved surfaces. I also had on hand multiple types of squeegees of varying hardness to allow me to really get the film to adhere to the nooks and crannies and not form air bubbles. Patience is key here. Took me a couple hours to get both headlamps done, but the results are pretty good. Not perfect, since I'm just an amateur, but good enough that you wouldn't tell there was a film until you got up close. For your fogs, being they are lower to the ground, they will be harder to see any imperfections. Even if you did get a perfect glass smooth application, they will get dinged up with debris and look rough over time. I had clear film over my stock foglamps and they kept their smooth look for maybe the first couple hundred miles till one got cracked.
 
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