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Do you think it's possible? I am considering buying a 2011 or possibly 2012 WRX. My goal is to go 500,000 miles in the next car I buy. Could a wrx do it?
 

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Any car could do it. The question is how many parts will have to be replaced to achieve 500,000 miles. If any car is used for winter driving it will rust away before you have mechanical failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
do subaru's generally tend to rust any faster than other cars? I have heard that they rust after only a few short years.
 

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The question is more cultural and philosophical than mechanical.

See "The Ship of Theseus." In most Western cultures, the Ship of Theseus is not considered the same ship after all the original parts have been replaced. In at least one Eastern culture, no distinction is made.

Assume two cars, an Impreza and a Legacy, each travel 500k with numerous parts substitutions. Are they the same car? Since the Impreza is Japanese, it would be the "same" car, so the answer would be yes. If the car were a Legacy (assembled in the US) in this example, the answer would be no.

Doubt that helps.
 

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I agree that [almost] any car could feasibly achieve 500k miles. Obviously things are going to need to be replaced. With proper maintenance and mindful driving I wouldn't be at all surprised to see an EJ motor go 350k miles with no serious problems. Or you could drive the hell out of it and replace the motor/transmission every 90k miles.


As far as rust, I have yet to see a single speck of rust on either of my Imprezas, and my current one is nearly ten years old now. Of course I live in TX, so that plays a factor.

Most of the cars I've seen that went over 500k on the original engine/transmission were continuously driven on very long road trips. I remember my brother talking about a Mercedes 300D that had 1.3 million miles on the original block. Apparently the owner would drive from Texas to Alaska and back several times a year.
 

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You mentioned the one car I would not be surprised at all to see at 500K, the Merc 300D. They were at one point the most popular taxi around, and some were simply not turned off unless it was for refueling or maintenance (brakes, oil, etc). Three or four shifts per day, day in day out. Great cars. Possibly the last of the great Mercs.
 

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Yeah, my brother's got one.. I need to motivate him to get it running again. Certainly a great car, a little frustrating to work on, but at least you can fix it in your driveway.. not the same with a new Mercedes.
 

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Assume two cars, an Impreza and a Legacy, each travel 500k with numerous parts substitutions. Are they the same car?
I would assert that a car placed in a vacuum chamber within a vault for 10 minutes is no longer the "same car". But then I'm weird that way...I see myself as having changed while typing this sentence.

</strange old man>
 

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Lando Calrissian
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As long as it is properly maintained, and not flogged on a regular basis it should last 500K with no problem. Yes, there will be parts replaced, but if it is well maintained, it should make over 500K easy.

As for the rust issues.... there are a two things that are a must if you live where they salt the roads. First, WASH THE SALT OFF REGULARLY. And I don't mean off of just the paint and wheels. Worst case, drive through one of those automated ones that has a carriage sprayer once a week during salt season. Best case, get under there with a hose and a garden or 'fire hose' style spray attachment and rinse the salt off. The vast majority of parts that will have issues rusting through have been coated or painted in some way at the factory, so removing the salt promptly will reduce or prevent rust from killing your car. Second, lift the hood and wash the engine bay, salt gets in there too, and will attack any bare metal, and could accelerate aging of some of the rubber as well. Worried about cleaning the engine bay.... read this http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/detailing-forum/134332797-how-safely-clean-engine-bay.html

I know many of you, like me, hate automated car washes and would rather take the time to hand wash and wax. I get it. But it is better to run through one of those during the winter to remove the salt, than to let your car rust.
 

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This is my dream car. No lie.
There are so many of these around that I have memories from several, not having owned any of them (yet?...). My friend picking me up to go to school. Taxis to parties, taxies to weddings, to funerals. Family members all together on holiday.

Merc cannot make a car like this any more, they've proven it. I don't think Subaru have it in them either. A Subaru can go the distance with enough parts but the parts count will be higher I think, despite (or maybe because) the Subaru is more modern.
 

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Merc cannot make a car like this any more, they've proven it. I don't think Subaru have it in them either. A Subaru can go the distance with enough parts but the parts count will be higher I think, despite (or maybe because) the Subaru is more modern.
I think there has been a paradigm shift in the past 30 years for all car makers. I think that they all realized that if they made a truly solid and dependable car, made to last, that they would eventually decrease their own sales. They all seem to make cars now that are designed to be replaced or require expensive repairs about eight or so years after initial sale, causing us to buy new more often. I am not saying this is some conspiracy or anything, just the way it seems. We can still find (easily) cars from the 40's through the 70's that are road worthy. I would be willing to bet that you will be hard pressed to find a decent 2003 WRX in 2023, let alone 2063. They just don't make cars like thy used to.
 

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With that Merc in particular, I think you are precisely correct: Paradigm shift. It is possibly the last Merc made without a price point target setting major decisions. It's the last chassis they sold with motors from 2,3L petrol to 3L turbo diesel, with everything and anything from air bags to the radio an "extra." The successors were more modern, sleeker, and generally better equipped since not everything was an option, things did come standard, but they were built to compete against something or other from someone or other else, not for their own sake.

The Impreza is an economy car in the US, a mid sized family car in the northern EU, and a large family car in the southern EU. It's built with price points and competitors in mind, and is much more complex. Shame.
 
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