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Master Baiter
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WAY too much information is being logged...

If you're just looking at an overall "health" check, get rid of coolant / intake / oil temperatures, fuel pressure, and TGV values; all that does is waste bandwidth and reduce the resolution of the useful data. Log a WOT pull from 2-2.5K to redline in 3rd gear. If you can do a WOT pull in 4th gear, do that as well (stay on the throttle as long as you feel comfortable).

Make individual logs, not one giant one.

General things to look for:
1) Dynamic Advance Multiplier should always be 1
2) Feedback / Fine Learned Knock should always be 0
3) TD Boost Error should be +/- 1 once you get around peak boost through redline.
 

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Master Baiter
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You really don't want to datalog too much information. Too many rows/columns makes parsing through the data difficult.

If you're not DIY tuning, all of the columns I told you to remove are not necessary for you. If you were going to be going in and editing compensation tables, for example, that might be of concern to you. You're only allocated a certain amount of bandwidth for reading information. By reducing the number of columns you're reading, you may get more rows of information, therefore, increasing the resolution, giving you more information on values you actually care about.

Overall "health" of a tune is generally most important during the most stress, which is during WOT pulls. That said, you should also probably datalog some part-throttle pulls, as well, since it's likely the majority of your driving will be in those throttle ranges.

Unless you're experiencing an issue, there are three main factors with the car that you should be concerned about:
1) Boost. Since this is a F/I vehicle, the amount of manifold pressure you're seeing is important. Other parameters such as TD Boost Error, Wastegate Duty Cycle, and Turbo Dynamics tables can diagnose boost issues.
2) Timing. Ignition timing tells you the total timing being run, but there is more to the story than that. There are two ignition tables (base and advance) and there are three knock control strategies that are employed by the Subaru ECU (rough, feedback, learned). Under perfect conditions, total timing = base + advance. Under knock conditions, however, it's reduced as per the various knock control strategy tables. You never want rough correction (reduced DAM value). Feedback knock is the ECU listening to the OE knock sensor and pulling timing because it senses detonation. Fine learned knock is the ECUs way of pulling timing preemptively based on previous feedback knock events to avoid detonation.
3) Air-Fuel Ratio. You're lucky in that you have a WBO2 sensor stock, which means your AFR Sensor 1 data is a lot more useful than previous models. Turbo Subarus on pump gas generally like to be tuned ~11:1 at WOT. Obviously, the modifications and the calibration of the map may change that, but that's a good general basis. You don't want to see AFRs like 10:1 or 12:1, but small variances isn't a problem. It wouldn't surprise me if Cobb has the car tuned at something like 10.6-10.8:1 as a safety buffer to help with the various conditions that their maps may see.

If you're running a Cobb map, and you're experiencing issues, make sure you contact Cobb support. In addition to the AP device and the base maps, you're also paying for support. They will help make sure that their product is running properly on your car.

Make the changes to the datalog parameters, log specific information in separate datalogs, and repost it here if you want us to review.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you so much letting her warm up to do some pulls i appreciate the wisdom dropped! I am still learning all of this and so far its been a blast!
 
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