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Discussion Starter #1
The 2020 Subaru WRX has 4 piston in front and two in the back. Is it a simple caliper swap to go 4 piston all around and if so where can I buy a set of the Brembo’s? Havent seen then anywhere. Thanks.
 

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If it's just for looks it's a waste of money.

Big brake kits are over rated. They cost multiple times more than sliding calipers, don't shine until they are pushed to the limit, and depending on what brake kit you have don't offer a selection of good street pads.

Keep what you have. Get a good set of pads and go on your day.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
So pad selection won’t be limited to one specific pad? I was assuming I’d say “year, make, model” and it’d be pretty specific given that they are Brembo. Haven’t needed a pad change yet. And ya, it’s basically just about visual balance. If I can find a good used set of 4 pistons for $5/600 bucks to match and it’s was an easy, even swap, I’d still do it...
 

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Maybe I miss understood. You just want to go to 4 piston monoblock calipers in the back to match the 4 piston monoblocks in the front.

No. Brakes are balanced a specific way. Usually front biased meaning your front brakes are going to be larger and capable of far more heat dispersion. Your rear brakes will be smaller, provide less absolute brake ability and for a reason.

Higher brake bias to the rear is going to make the car dangerous and unpredictable.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe I miss understood. You just want to go to 4 piston monoblock calipers in the back to match the 4 piston monoblocks in the front.

No. Brakes are balanced a specific way. Usually front biased meaning your front brakes are going to be larger and capable of far more heat dispersion. Your rear brakes will be smaller, provide less absolute brake ability and for a reason.

Higher brake bias to the rear is going to make the car dangerous and unpredictable.
I can still get a selection of high quality pads? They won’t just be specific to the Brembos...
 

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Yeah, the stock brakes have a huge selection of great pads. Find a set in the heat range you need. Brake pads for racing are going to be horrible on the road.
 

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BooSTIng
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You could invest your money in to other places and get better results. Like suspension and handling. Honestly if you want to do anything to your brakes, get stainless lines, good fluid, and a nice set of pads and rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You could invest your money in to other places and get better results. Like suspension and handling. Honestly if you want to do anything to your brakes, get stainless lines, good fluid, and a nice set of pads and rotors.
I have no idea what to even look for in a pad with Brembos. I ran semi-metallic pads on my last car once. I wore the rotors down almost clean through and the pads were not even 50% worn. I ran low dust ceramic after that. These current rotors get rust spots on them every wash and any morning with dew. Have to grind that rust off the first few stops. So at some point I’m definitely going to be looking for some stainless cross drilled slotted something nice rotors. But as far as replacement pads... no idea what I’m looking for, like at say... SubiSpeed...
I’d be looking for a blend of long life, low dust. Just overall good quality.
 

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Look at w company like EBC. They will sell pads in various flavors for use on the street as a daily driver or sport for a more agressive street performance or somewhere where you have a lot of downhill like mountains in the west.

It's less important what the compound is. And more important it's right for your use.
 

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BooSTIng
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EBC is good. So are Hawk pads. On my STi I have goodridge SS lines, Motul 5.1 fluid, DBA clubspec 4000 series rotors, and hawk HPS pads. The stopping power is incredible. I also have Brembo's with having an STi.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
EBC is good. So are Hawk pads. On my STi I have goodridge SS lines, Motul 5.1 fluid, DBA clubspec 4000 series rotors, and hawk HPS pads. The stopping power is incredible. I also have Brembo's with having an STi.
Awesome. I’ll look into those thanks.
 

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Brakes and other mods to a motor vehicle must be balanced. Make it go fast, then make it stop fast. But before any mod, learn your and what you drive/ride limits, then start modfing.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I will probably be going with a mild upgrade, street style pad and a nice looking rotor. Slotted drilled 🤷🏻‍♂️ Something that looks nice. And stainless lines. Completely unnecessary at this time, but if I’m going to have the wheels off....might as well. 😂. I’ve never bought anything else besides “basic brake fluid” That’s something I need to research in the coming months.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
EBC is good. So are Hawk pads. On my STi I have goodridge SS lines, Motul 5.1 fluid, DBA clubspec 4000 series rotors, and hawk HPS pads. The stopping power is incredible. I also have Brembo's with having an STi.
I looked into those. Your post really pointed me in the right direction. I was way overplayed with what I was looking at. Just narrowing down between 3 rotors. Why did you choose that fluid?
 

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Æternum
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First off, the 2020 with the Brembo solution has a 4-piston caliper in the front. The standard offering is a sliding 2-piston caliper.

Secondly, front brakes are far more important in a street car that has been setup with street suspension. Weight transfer under braking will utilize about 70% front brakes. For performance, a better pad and fluid up front is far more important and significantly cheaper than what you are proposing.

FWIW, even the "much larger" modern STI Brembos sport a 2-piston caliper in the rear. Don't be so obsessed with the number of pistons. Pad area and caliper stiffness are far more important than the number of pistons in a caliper. I honestly lament the fact that Subaru jumped to a 6 piston front caliper in the STI when there were significantly better 4 piston options available as an upgrade to the old Brembos.
 
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