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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone out their that knows motorcycles. what would be a good one to get if your not 25 so insurance isnt a pain. Im only 17 am i to young to get ANY bike? i like crotchrockets more then harley types and if i got a crotchrocket i dont want a big one because this would be my first bike. what would be a good bike to recamend me if any? im not looking to do stunts just to cruise around responsibley, and second yes i would be getting FULL gear.

Thanks

Jason
 

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Well, crotch rocket enthusiasts here will scoff, but I learned on a Suzuki GS500E. It's a parallel twin; faster than most cars you're going to meet, but not outrageously so. Suzuki now has their GS500F, which is the same basic bike in a fairing.
 

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I had a Kawasaki Ninja 500R also known as the EX500. That's a great beginner bike and gives you the nice sporty look and feel of a crotchrocket. It has a lower seating height and you don't have to lean fully forward like other models which is nice.

You should take a motorcycle course where they test you for your liscence. That will definately teach you alot plus get you 10% off the insurance.
 

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Also, a good way to learn the basics is to do the dirtbike thing a few times. You get a feel for the basic mechanics of changing gears, etc. Then you can try a lightweight street bike.
 

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<------- This 1976 CB 550 was my first bike. I still love riding it with its whopping 50hp. You may want something a little less vintage though.;)

Definitely take the motorcycle safety course.
 

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i was just gonna recommend the gs500 as well. and no, ur not too young.

u should def take the MSF course first. they'll give you 250's to learn on ... really fun.

if this is will be your very first bike, other good ones to learn on are

ninja 250/500 (yes, i know sportbike oriented, but still fun to learn on)
any of the smaller honda nighthawks
katana (maybe?)
seca (?)
sv650 (might be pushing it tho)

the worry for some people is they think they will outgrow the bike after their first season, and dont want to have to sell then buy another bike ... so they start looking at 600s and up. what they dont realize is they wont learn the bike's full potential if they start too big, and wind up getting themselves in trouble.

the key is learn on something that's not gonna bite ya in the ass too badly. try to stay under 600cc .. and you should be fine.

check out http://www.beginnerbikes.com/index.html
if you wanna learn more.
 

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I took the MSF for my cycle license. I got to ride a Honda Rebel (125?). It was a while ago.

Definitely take the MSF class. They teach you survival skills you might otherwise not know. Plus, you get a pretty cool sticker! :p

My first bike (which I bought just before getting my license) was a Yamaha FZR600 and I was very comfortable riding it as my first bike. But I've been ridding dirtbikes for a while prior.

Bigger displacement bikes might have more power than than middleweights, but most modern middleweights have enough power to hurt you too. It boils down to some common sense and wrist control. My FZR sure scared me a few times.

Have you ridden motorcycles before? If not, I would stay away all but the smallest sportbikes. Standards are much easier to maneuver, especially at lower speeds, and they have much better turning radius than sportbikes.

Any of the middleweight sportbikes from the big 4 will be great rides. I haven't follwed the bike scene for a while, but back then some bikes are not as 'hardcore' as others - like Honda VFRs which were more "sport cruisers." Others are just track bikes - like a GSXR. Constant trade off between all-out performance and comfort.

As everyone else have said, wear proper protection (which MSF will teach you).

Have fun!
 

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I really don't think that an SV650 would be too big, however I definitely wouldn't go any larger. I know when I started riding it was on a GS550 and I just felt like I outgrew the bike very quickly which left me trying to get rid of it...which fortunately didn't take too long. The SV is lightweight and has plenty of power so that you will be happy with the bike for a long time but not too much power to get you into trouble (although that can happen on any bike). It doesn't wheelie effortlessly like most other sportbikes of the same size.

Happy bike hunting.
Shane
 

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I think an SV650 is the way to go. I learned on one, fast enough that you dont get bored, easy to ride. Easy to upgrade or even race if thats what you want. Good luck, take it slow is my advice
 

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I have an SV650.
I think its a good bike.....not too much power, but still enough to do wheelies in 1st thru 3rd gear. So you wont outgrow it too fast.
Less expensive ~$6500 brand new
Lightweight - Aluminum frame (03's and up i think)
Has good torque (V-twin) - so you dont have to rev high to get power (good for beginners)
 

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EX 500 is a great bike to start out with, and definately take the MSF course. You might think a 500 is a bit small to start out with but if you have never been on a bike before you are in for a suprise if you jump on any 600 ss bike for the first time. Good luck and be careful!
 

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I would also reccomend the EX500 or SV650...great bikes. Really, any of the japanese motorcycles will be good. Incredibly well built machines all. I might suggest you buy a used one, and not shy away from one that is, shall we say, "cosmetically challenged". I only say this because as your first bike it will likely be dropped at some point, and its much less painful if youre not still making payments on it. Another alternitave would be a small bore (250-400cc) dual purpose bike; good to learn on, and you have the ability to ride some trails; riding on dirt will greatly improve your skills, and is much much fun. Whatever you do, get out and ride. Ive been riding over 30 years and heartily endorse it. Oh, and...be careful;)
-Ray
 

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Also, I'm not sure what size you are but don't get a bike that you can't pick up when it's laying on it's side. I've seen many people get huge bikes and can't even get them on their center stand much less upright them from being layed over. You should be pretty safe if you get a newer 500-650 since materials have gotten much lighter.

Oh yeah, forgot to mention before...proper gear and a riding course such as MSF will be your two best friends. (Other than your bike and a twisty road :wiggles: )
 

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rayray said:
I only say this because as your first bike it will likely be dropped at some point, and its much less painful if youre not still making payments on it.
yup ... agreed. Two types of riders, i say ... those who have been down, and those who are gonna go down. it's inevitable.
 

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camell0 said:
yup ... agreed. Two types of riders, i say ... those who have been down, and those who are gonna go down. it's inevitable.
"If you're gonna ride, you're gonna slide."

(I lucked out, and never went down in my 5 years of riding...) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
RayfieldsWRX said:
Also, a good way to learn the basics is to do the dirtbike thing a few times. You get a feel for the basic mechanics of changing gears, etc. Then you can try a lightweight street bike.

i know how to change the gears fine. i had a 400ex. used to be a hardcore quad dude. and i have ridden dirtbikes too 250r
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you everyone, for not yelling at me for asking and saying ooo your to young, your a dumb kid wanting to hurthimself and such. i appreciate it. Right now where fixing up a Honda Hawk from 1978 just to learn a little on. then i was looking to buy a bike in the next few years. so you guys recammend SV650 .. would i still be alright with a 600rr or is that to much?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
what does the vs650 do? for a comparision
 
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