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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to buy an VR4, well, I'm reaaaally looking for reasons why I should buy a wrx:thumbup: rather than a vr4, but anyway I guess that the Mitsu 3.0 TTs are interference engines, and so how does that compare to wrx 2.0s and 2.5s? The reason I would buy a VR4 is because they are cheaper. Sorry if this is a newb question. Don't be trolling though.
 

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Yes, they are interference engines.

Frankly of all the reasons I could find to prefer one over the other, this isn't anywhere on the radar, much less near the top.
 

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What does it being an interference engine have to do with it?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
They said that if you have a timing malfunction, you would destroy your engine. I am really pretty ignorant, as a self taught 16 yo.
 

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They said that if you have a timing malfunction, you would destroy your engine. I am really pretty ignorant, as a self taught 16 yo.
I'm pretty ignorant as a self taught 29 year old :rotfl:

A timing issue that would destroy your engine would really only occur if you don't take care of the timing belt within the recommended intervals (every 105k miles per Subaru) and it failed.

So what the hell is an example for a freewheeling engine anyway?
 

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I'm looking for allll the reasons. Speaking of which, what reasons would you give?
To prefer a Subaru over a Mitsubishi? I have owned an older turbo Mitsubishi, and I would put its reliability at no more than one or two clicks above a Wankel -- and we're talking the motor alone. The drivetrain was also problematic. Since I don't want to bore you, I'd urge you to look at Mitsu-specific sites and see what you think.

Incidentally, the balance shaft system Mitsubishi developed and inflicted not only on their own customers, but also on those poor souls that decided to buy Porsches instead, isn't illegal per se but it really ought to be banned. I consider it immoral. That both the Japanese and the Germans (who presumably paid good money to license it back in the era of the Deutsche Mark...) insisted on using this is sickening.

There are other fun little details, from water pumps to transfer cases, but again, I don't want to bore you.

Somebody told me freewheeling engines are better than interference engines.
I suggest you ask that someone for the specific answers then. Before you do so, you might want to consider why manufacturers use interference designs. Could there be inherent advantages to the setup? Also, you could ask that someone to define "better" because I strongly suspect the definition given will not be what engine designers had in mind.
 

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I'm pretty ignorant as a self taught 29 year old :rotfl:

A timing issue that would destroy your engine would really only occur if you don't take care of the timing belt within the recommended intervals (every 105k miles per Subaru) and it failed.

So what the hell is an example for a freewheeling engine anyway?
Cars that use timing chains not belts. Off the top of my head I can't think of one though.
 

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Cars that use timing chains not belts. Off the top of my head I can't think of one though.
Nissan still used chains in midsized engines in the modern era, and I believe Mitsu has also though I am unsure. There are others as well; one example is Ford in their large-midsize motors.

Anyway, I suspect "freewheeling" at least in this context means an engine in which the valves and pistons cannot meet regardless of timing, whether the timing is maintained by a belt or a chain or even gears -- but I'm unsure; we'd have to ask the person with which the OP spoke.
 

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Flatheads are freewheeling, AKA L block, used alot in hot rods and stuff. And Mazda makes a freewheeling engine. Looked that last one up. also used in motorcycles. Flathead engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Some flatheads could have archaeological value but if you are not an academic or a museum enthusiast there is little reason to consider them. However, there is at least one aircraft using a flathead in Asia even today. Japanese auto motors have moved on decades ago, and rightfully so.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
To prefer a Subaru over a Mitsubishi? I have owned an older turbo Mitsubishi, and I would put its reliability at no more than one or two clicks above a Wankel -- and we're talking the motor alone. The drivetrain was also problematic. Since I don't want to bore you, I'd urge you to look at Mitsu-specific sites and see what you think.

Incidentally, the balance shaft system Mitsubishi developed and inflicted not only on their own customers, but also on those poor souls that decided to buy Porsches instead, isn't illegal per se but it really ought to be banned. I consider it immoral. That both the Japanese and the Germans (who presumably paid good money to license it back in the era of the Deutsche Mark...) insisted on using this is sickening.

There are other fun little details, from water pumps to transfer cases, but again, I don't want to bore you.



I suggest you ask that someone for the specific answers then. Before you do so, you might want to consider why manufacturers use interference designs. Could there be inherent advantages to the setup? Also, you could ask that someone to define "better" because I strongly suspect the definition given will not be what engine designers had in mind.
What exactly is wrong with the balance shaft?
 

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What exactly is wrong with the balance shaft?
A failure may result in any/all of the following:

Timing belt failure.
Timing cover failure.
Balance shaft bearing failure -- thus shrapnel in the engine. If so, oil pump and/or other stuff that's both costly and inaccessible can also go.

A failure could also result in none of the above. They did this I think to keep the fun times rolling; keeps you guessing and on your toes.

Now, when you said "VR4" you meant the twin turbo 6. I find it remarkable that there are survivors in any numbers but to be fair, the balance shaft issue is for the single turbo 4 VR4 model (and any subsequent car using the same turbo 4).

The 6 had a fun water pump if memory serves (I try to forget; do you wish you could selectively forget things?).
 

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Gotcha...thanks for the good reads. E36 BMWs used Timing chains...

And to think about it...when's the last time you saw a VR4 of any kind still in good working order that already hasn't been rebuilt or isn't a garage queen? Pretty cars with a ton of potential...but also with a ton of potential headaches as well.
 

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Gotcha...thanks for the good reads. E36 BMWs used Timing chains...

And to think about it...when's the last time you saw a VR4 of any kind still in good working order that already hasn't been rebuilt or isn't a garage queen? Pretty cars with a ton of potential...but also with a ton of potential headaches as well.
My friend back in college had one for a year or so. It was full of neat gizmos like 4 wheel steering, and it was chock-full of 90s tech on the interior, but he could never seem to keep it running for more than a month at a time, and all of the complicated electronics inside were never all working at the same time.

He was a competent mechanic, and did his dardest to stem the tide of things not working, but finally sold it off out of frustration.

Im not trolling or trying to rain too hard on Mitsubishi (although my personal experiences have never been good with them), it's just the observations I made watching my friend try to keep that car going day in and day out.
 
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