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I live in Kansas right now where the temperature in the winter gets below 0 and stays at least in the thirtys for months, and in summer spends weeks if not months sometimes above 100. How would this effect the performance of my car if it was tuned and modded. Would you need to tweak the tune per the current season?

My other question is, I travel back to home to California often, and sometimes I drive there and back. Is it hard on the engine if it was tuned and modded to make long drives like that? How about fuel economy, better worse stagnant?
 

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I live in Kansas right now where the temperature in the winter gets below 0 and stays at least in the thirtys for months, and in summer spends weeks if not months sometimes above 100. How would this effect the performance of my car if it was tuned and modded. Would you need to tweak the tune per the current season?
Technically yes. I tune my own vehicle so it's no big deal. I tweak the compensation maps to get the most performance year round without causing detrimental damage to the engine.
My other question is, I travel back to home to California often, and sometimes I drive there and back. Is it hard on the engine if it was tuned and modded to make long drives like that? How about fuel economy, better worse stagnant?
Driving to California is no harder on the car than driving to and from work. Highway cruising is no different other than you actually might see an improvement in MPG. The only thing hard on the engine is WOT. The problem generally is some states only offer certain octanes.
 

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Yes. More so on not using a lesser octane.
 

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Your car sees way more compensation going over the mountains than anything else. If it was a high elevation tune it might be a problem at lower altitudes (not the opposite though it might suck).
 

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The biggest problem with a high elevation tune at a low elevation is the increased boost pressures. I was tuned at 17psi on my VF39 tune up here, and went down to california, and I was hitting 18.5psi and boost cut.
 

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It's where the ECU decides your boost is too high for the tune, and pulls fuel, boost, and timing. Throws the car into "limp mode".
 
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