lugs came lose after plasti dipping
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This is a discussion on lugs came lose after plasti dipping within the Suspension & Wheels forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; so i plassti dipped my wheels last night. let them dry over night, i went and put them back on ...

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    Registered User Motoxdude6's Avatar
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    lugs came lose after plasti dipping

    so i plassti dipped my wheels last night. let them dry over night, i went and put them back on today. pulled out the owners manual in it says 88-110 ft lbs of torque for the lugs. unless i was looking at the wrong section ( im pretty sure i was in correct section) so i tightened them to about 95 just to be on the safe side. well, after driving on them today i started to hear a wierd noise so when i got home i got out and checked my lugs and multiple lugs were lose. i could move them around with my hand. not sure why they came lose if i torqued them properly. if anyone has any tips on what could have gone wrong please let me know. i have kids and the lasat thing i need is for my wheels to fall off while driving with them. im going to discount tire in the morning to have them check the torque on them. but i need to know whats going on thanks

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    Registered User wrxnguyen's Avatar
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    I guarantee you that plasti dip is not the problem. Your lug nuts are probably not torqued correctly

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    Registered User subypete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrxnguyen View Post
    I guarantee you that plasti dip is not the problem. Your lug nuts are probably not torqued correctly
    Sure about that? Lugs/studs are a bolted joint and a significant portion of the friction comes from the interaction of the tapered mating surfaces. Plasti dip is much softer than a good coating/paint... especially if it gets hot. So there would likely be a lot less friction between the two surfaces. But, I'm not a wheel engineer, so I could be wrong.

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    I got plasti dip on my wheels in my range rover (off road vehicle), my wifes Forester, and my WRX , never had any problems with wheel nuts getting loose at all,,,,,

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    Registered User wrxnguyen's Avatar
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    I've plasti dipped so many wheels I'm basically a master wizard. I've done them on a tacoma, civic, xb, wrx, mazda3, and an accord. Never had problems with lug nuts being loose. I guarantee you it's not plasti dip.

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    Registered User mmiller2002's Avatar
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    Did you get the plasti dip in the lug holes? the lugs need to meet the wheel metal-to-metal.
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    \_(ツ)_/ Rambo's Avatar
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    I plastidipped my winter steelies all over, including in the lug holes, and never had a problem with lug nuts loosening.

    Improper torquing is to blame. Did you torque the lugs in a star pattern?
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    Registered User mmiller2002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
    I plastidipped my winter steelies all over, including in the lug holes, and never had a problem with lug nuts loosening.
    You're lucky, then...

    Torque specs and the design are meant to be a predictable, consistent metal-to-metal contact with no lube on the threads also.
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  10. #9
    \_(ツ)_/ Rambo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmiller2002 View Post
    You're lucky, then...

    Torque specs and the design are meant to be a predictable, consistent metal-to-metal contact with no lube on the threads also.
    I respectfully disagree with you, and here is why:

    The equation for a torque spec with a 90% proof-load is:

    T = K*D*.9*.85(Yield strength)(pi/4)[.5(2*D-1.948557*p)]^2

    Where:
    K = K factor for lubricated vs. non-lubricated threads. Lubed: K=0.15, Non-lubed: K=0.20 (Lubed threads actually require LESS torque)
    D = basic bolt diameter
    Yield strength is determined by the material properties.
    p = thread pitch

    This equation does not factor the coefficient of friction of the nut against the wheel, it uses the coefficient of friction between the lug nut and the wheel stud threads, neither of which are affected by the plastidip. You are on the right track about friction playing a role, but you're looking at the wrong parts. Regardless, the surface contact between the nut and stud threads will be much larger than the contact between the nut and wheel. Following your logic, people with powdercoated, painted, carbon fiber, etc wheels would have them loosening all the time.

    I stand by my argument that a properly torqued wheel to factory specs in a star pattern is safe regardless of the wheel coating. I would add that they should always be double checked a day after they have been torqued, to ensure they have not loosened with the various forces of driving. This is a common safety practice in any case.
    Last edited by Rambo; 01-08-2014 at 03:03 PM.
    Isaac -- 2003 WRX sedan Stg II - Gave its life for mine 6/2013.
    2007 Outback 3.0R wagon
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    The pursuit of knowledge is hopeless and eternal... Hooray!!! - Professor Farnsworth

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