little punks...
Results 1 to 13 of 13

This is a discussion on little punks... within the North Central States forums, part of the Regional Discussion category; pictures speak a thousand words... yes, that is stevo from the boards...he's got the crystal Grey metallic STI at the ...

  1. #1
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017

    little punks...

    pictures speak a thousand words...


    yes, that is stevo from the boards...he's got the crystal Grey metallic STI at the meets
    Last edited by speelnik; 02-02-2006 at 07:26 AM.
    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  2. Remove Advertisements
    ClubWRX.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Registered User xq89olp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    625
    Is that a pencil or what?
    Fat, bald, and lazy. What more could a girl want?

    People are bastard covered bastards with bastard centers.

  4. #3
    Registered User Yotsuya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    44
    Back when I was in school we used to get in trouble if we were seen doing that sort of thing...

    Reminds me of a Simpsons quote: "Videotaping this crime spree is the best idea ever!"

  5. #4
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017
    yeah well, schools now are fun.


    oh and a fun fact:


    With the "No Child Left Behind" Legislation, every school in illinois failed to meet the minimum requirements with the exception of 8 schools. Mine is one of the 8...woot woot.
    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  6. #5
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017
    i have a sophomore girl who recently placed in a state architecture competition (a huge feat on it's own). She is one of my prodigy students. She just started her conceptual model project today...and this is where it is currently at:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2680.JPG   2682.JPG   2683.JPG   2684.JPG   2679.JPG  

    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  7. #6
    Boba Fett BrianH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Way up high.
    Posts
    17,902
    Heh isn't that the chick that used to show up to the meets?


    Also, no child left behind seems to be a heaving scoop of bull****. My mother now has to attempt to teach children that can't actually communicate, require an aid to do everything in their day, and whose parents just don't want to pay to have them put in a special school / home. Hey why not dump them off on public education, it's cheaper.

  8. #7
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017
    yeah, no child left behind is a nightmare for educators. It was doomed to fail before it even bagan. I guess that's what you get for letting politicians make educational decisions. God forbid a teacher instead of a lawyer started making legislation.

    Anyway, we just had a school meeting announcing we actually accomplished the goals of NCLB. That means big brother can get the **** out of our school and let us make our own decisions.

    I definatly feel for your mother and the rest of the teachers (minus the 8 schools) in the state.
    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  9. #8
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017
    for those unfamilar, this is the Illinois State summary of NCLB (propoganda):


    Summary
    As one of the federal governments most sweeping changes to education in a generation, the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act will affect every school and district in Illinois.

    The acts overall purpose is to ensure that children in every classroom enjoy the benefits of well-prepared teachers, research-based curriculum and safe learning environments.

    President George W. Bush signed into law on January 8, 2002. It provides nearly $1 billion a year over the next five years to strengthen public schools.

    NCLB is a blend of new requirements, new incentives and new resources. Some of its provisions will challenge states, schools and districts to take immediate action. Others will be implemented over the long term.

    The page links to information that can help educators, parents and communities understand and prepare for the changes NCLB will bring.

    NCLB is an exciting opportunity to align federal and state initiatives in common support of higher student achievement, stronger public schools and a better-prepared teacher workforce.
    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  10. #9
    t
    t is offline
    Registered User t's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    1,637
    How many schools are there in IL ? Probably hundreds right? I'd love to see how they're going to fix this, especially in every state.

  11. #10
    Boba Fett BrianH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Way up high.
    Posts
    17,902
    Quote Originally Posted by t
    How many schools are there in IL ? Probably hundreds right? I'd love to see how they're going to fix this, especially in every state.

    they didn't think about that.

  12. #11
    Registered User speelnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    the mullet godfather "TMR"
    Posts
    1,017
    criticizm:


    Criticism
    Education/Richard Becker
    March 19-20, 2005 - Across the nation, opposition seems to be rising regarding the No Child Left Behind law. The Salt Lake Tribune has reported that the Utah legislature is upset that it is "unfunded", and the Minneapolis Star Tribune complains that "Kids who need help don't get it under No Child left Behind law", and the Denver Post has joined the fray.
    A Denver Post Perspective page editorial of 3-13-05 declares in the headline "No Child Left Behind is failing", then notes in the first paragraph: "If Colorado was to fully comply with the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the state would actually have to lower its standards." In the third paragraph, the editorial states that "plenty of children are still being left behind as states grapple with unfunded mandates and twist their already adopted standards to conform with the federal law".

    The problem is that Colorado and the other 49 states have already been lowing standards over the last three decades to create the problem that NCLB (and Colorado's CSAP) merely revealed. In a news conference of December 16th, 2004, Governor Owens announced that 27% of 2003 Colorado high school graduates required high school remedial work as college freshmen. That is up from just under 25% a decade ago, and has increased despite increased spending on schools. As a high school graduate of '53, and a high school Industrial Education teacher '66-'72, this writer knows from first hand knowledge and experience that there did not exist the need for high school remedial work prior to the mid '60s.

    Further evidence that education standards have been lowered over the last three decades was a college textbook discovered (on 3-11-05) while rummaging in the used book section of a local thrift store for a textbook on CNC programming for illustration of my eduction reform objectives. Titled "ARITHMETIC FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS, it is the 6th edition published in 1991, and the price tag on the front is dated 5-05-94 indicating when it was on the shelves and purchased. The other editions were in 1969, 1975, 1979, 1983, and 1987, indicating that failure to properly teach arithmetic began prior to 1969 to the extent the book was required to remediate college students lacking basic arithmetic required for any higher mathematics. The very arithmetic this writer (and many of my era up through the '50s) was taught in elementary school in the early '40s!

    This editorial illustrates the fallacy behind the thinking of No Child Left Behind opponents who wail about "unfunded mandates". It is apparent that many have the idea that the law would somehow provide remedial work to impart that which schools have failed to impart in their schooling system that passes for education! Actually, the law has accomplished what was intended, to illustrate academic short-comings of the instructional material and teaching methods that has been failing for some time to create a functionally illiterate populace, while clamoring for increased spending to fund a failing system. Rather than more "paste-on" federally funded programs, the key is to improve instruction and teaching methods to impart the academic knowledge to students as per what students should know at any given age and grade level and meet the standards established by the NCLB act.

    The Denver Post of 9-9-93, page 2 had a Washington Post story "American illiteracy a sad fact", and noted in the subhead that "Many read, write so poorly it affects jobs". The first paragraph notes that "Nearly half of all adult Americans read and write so poorly that it is difficult for them to hold a decent job, according to the most comprehensive literacy study ever done by the U.S. government." ! A Knight-ridder story in the Denver Post of 7-3-91 "Students lack basic job skills, study says", states in the first paragraph:"Now even entry-level blue-collar workers must be able to read diagrams and manuals, write memos justifying expenses or interpreting data: maintain numerical records and interpret statistics; reason how these things fit together; and work with other people in solving daily problems in the business world". The NCLB law merely focused attention on the problems that have been festering for some time, but ignored by schools and media clamoring for increased spending that was no solution to the real problem of poor quality instructional material and poor teaching ability.

    The basic premise of the NCLB law is a test to evaluate what, if anything, students are learning so that schools, not programs funded by the federal government, can provide the special help. Not only special help as remedial work, but evaluation of the course materials and the teacher's presentation methods and effect changes that enables students to learn and retain the material they should know at the age/grade level of the individual. Apparently, opponents of the NCLB program see it as some sort of "magical" remedial program to accomplish after the fact that whch schools fail to teach as revealed by testing. In other words, the NCLB law merely restored the testing that prevailed prior to the late '60s when it was abolished as "damaging to self-esteem" of slower learners who would feel bad about themselves when inidividuals academically advanced get better grades than the slower students.

    The mind with out the basic facts and knowledge imparted via education is no more useful than a computer with out software! The human mind is an organic computer of potentially infinite capacity. Unless it is loaded with quality academic "software" to create an "operating system" for thinking and reasoning ability, and establish an academic data base of facts and knowledge on which to draw when arriving at a conclusion based on data input from the senses, it cannot function any better than an electronic computer lacking software. The computer industry axiom of GIGO (garbage in = garbage out) applies. This is true whether the individual is entering college, a vocational school, technical school, the workforce, or just getting along in life after high school graduation.

    An educated direct and indirect labor workforce is essential if the U.S. is to compete in world markets. Already, many companies are looking overseas for engineers because too few educated engineers are being produced by the Nation's colleges and universities. One major reason that American manufacturing is being sent overseas is the lack of an educated direct labor workforce in the United States, but one that can readily be found outside the U.S because all students are educated regardless of post-secondary options. Some rationalize the "outsourcing" of manufacturing by claiming that it will be offset by foreign companies bring manufacturing jobs into the United States. The perceptual fallacy of that premise is evident when it is realized that foreign companies would face the same lack of an educated direct labor force as the reason manufacturing is being outsourced in the first place.

    The nation's schools already have more than adequate funding, so the key is a change in the scope, structure and content of the schools to reflect/restore the education concepts that existed in the past when spending per student was less but quality was high to the extent no remedial work was required.

    On page 44 of a U.S. News & World Report story of 1-9-75 noted that spending per student K-12 in 1965 was $484 per student, and it increased in 10 years to $1,255 in 1975. Today, spending is over $6,000 per student amid a clamor for more spending as education quality has declined despite increased spending. Yet, there did not exist at that time the need for academic high school remedial work for college freshmen OR vocational and technical students. Especially basic arithmetic taught as a college course.

    Richard Becker, Broomfield, CO who is a former high school industrial education teacher ('66-'72)with knowledge and experience in the manufacturing industry before and after college.
    Former 03wrx, 04sti, 05sti, current 06civic
    "Teacher POWah"
    Team Mullet Racing
    BrianH is my biotch

  13. #12
    Registered User nvmywrx's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    chitown
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by speelnik
    yeah well, schools now are fun.
    speak for your school
    Quote Originally Posted by Trainrex
    Nah, it was Colonel Mustard, using teh shockAr in teh bedroom.

  14. #13
    Registered User Yotsuya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    44
    Dude; that's the Barbie Frank Lloyd Wright Apartment, with the elevator in the corner. It would be interesting to see that built up. The shapes remind me of the art museum they're building in Golden Gate Park in SF.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •