WRX IN SNOW? - Page 3
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 48

This is a discussion on WRX IN SNOW? within the New Member Hangout forums, part of the Community - Meet other Enthusiasts category; Originally Posted by Jbravo_AK Wow don't go power bombing nissan like that. The Nissan GTR is AWD and outperforms any ...

  1. #31
    zax
    zax is offline
    \_(ツ)_/ zax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Neverland Ranch, Maryland
    Posts
    12,678
    I Support ClubWRX I Support ClubWRX
    Quote Originally Posted by Jbravo_AK View Post
    Wow don't go power bombing nissan like that. The Nissan GTR is AWD and outperforms any subaru anyday.
    In the snow? Doubtful. The GTR is primarily RWD with up to 30% engine torque allocated to the front wheels.

    Wow, so much misinformation in this thread. There's always at least one GTR nutswinger that gets offended when anyone mentions Nissan.
    2015 CWP WRX STi ... But how did I get roped back into an EJ motor?!
    Zax's utterly unimaginably stock 2015 STi build thread
    Zax's Shaggin' Wagon Build Thread Now tuned for 99% pure Unicorn Jizz!

    Zach | Moderator -- Mid-Atlantic States, Tech & Modifying & General Repairs
    Rollin' with the Bugeye Mafia #302 | N.E.R.D. Subject Zero
    Facebook me here

    Your Mid-A local board: http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/mid-atlantic-states/

  2. Remove Advertisements
    ClubWRX.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #32
    Registered User Jbravo_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    102
    Quote Originally Posted by zax View Post
    In the snow? Doubtful. The GTR is primarily RWD with up to 30% engine torque allocated to the front wheels.

    Wow, so much misinformation in this thread. There's always at least one GTR nutswinger that gets offended when anyone mentions Nissan.
    apparently you havent read up on the GTR much....its not a 30% your information is wrong.


    During a standing start, the system sends only 2% of the available torque to the front wheels and 98% to the rear, essentially making the GT-R a rear-wheel drive car. Thanks to the amount of sensors, clutches and UFO technology Nissan has invested in it, front and rear torque split can change in milliseconds to a maximum of 50:50.

    Unlike most conventional all-wheel drive systems and given the transmission's transaxle positioning, the GT-R ATTESA E-TS uses two almost parallel driveshafts, with a second driveshaft running slightly to the right of the main driveshaft and engine sending power exclusively to the front wheels through an open differential.

    The other driveshaft, or better yet, the main one, goes from the engine to the rear-based gearbox, from where it sends power through a limited slip differential to the rear wheels, therefore varying the left/right torque split at the rear axle. Integrated into the double-clutch gearbox there's a transfer case in which, instead of a center differential lies a center wet multi-plate clutch system.

    Translated into real life performance, this means that the GT-R's all-wheel drive system is pro-active, just like BMW's xDrive. For example, when entering a corner with full braking power, the transmission ECU will perform an action mimicking an engine brake, while with the help of the sensors the ATTESA E-TS ECU will continuously vary the power sent to each wheel up to a 50:50 torque split in real time.
    2013 Subaru STI

  4. #33
    zax
    zax is offline
    \_(ツ)_/ zax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Neverland Ranch, Maryland
    Posts
    12,678
    I Support ClubWRX I Support ClubWRX
    Quote Originally Posted by Jbravo_AK View Post
    apparently you havent read up on the GTR much....its not a 30% your information is wrong.


    During a standing start, the system sends only 2% of the available torque to the front wheels and 98% to the rear, essentially making the GT-R a rear-wheel drive car. Thanks to the amount of sensors, clutches and UFO technology Nissan has invested in it, front and rear torque split can change in milliseconds to a maximum of 50:50.

    Unlike most conventional all-wheel drive systems and given the transmission's transaxle positioning, the GT-R ATTESA E-TS uses two almost parallel driveshafts, with a second driveshaft running slightly to the right of the main driveshaft and engine sending power exclusively to the front wheels through an open differential.

    The other driveshaft, or better yet, the main one, goes from the engine to the rear-based gearbox, from where it sends power through a limited slip differential to the rear wheels, therefore varying the left/right torque split at the rear axle. Integrated into the double-clutch gearbox there's a transfer case in which, instead of a center differential lies a center wet multi-plate clutch system.

    Translated into real life performance, this means that the GT-R's all-wheel drive system is pro-active, just like BMW's xDrive. For example, when entering a corner with full braking power, the transmission ECU will perform an action mimicking an engine brake, while with the help of the sensors the ATTESA E-TS ECU will continuously vary the power sent to each wheel up to a 50:50 torque split in real time.
    You're right about the 50%... Oh, and I have read up on ATTESSA since I've been helping the community here: http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/transmission-awd/134395793-limited-slip-differential-elsd-faq.html#post3515769
    2015 CWP WRX STi ... But how did I get roped back into an EJ motor?!
    Zax's utterly unimaginably stock 2015 STi build thread
    Zax's Shaggin' Wagon Build Thread Now tuned for 99% pure Unicorn Jizz!

    Zach | Moderator -- Mid-Atlantic States, Tech & Modifying & General Repairs
    Rollin' with the Bugeye Mafia #302 | N.E.R.D. Subject Zero
    Facebook me here

    Your Mid-A local board: http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/mid-atlantic-states/

  5. #34
    Registered User Jbravo_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    102
    i wouldn't say im a nissan fan boy i just have been impressed with the newer GTR and what it can do. Plus the GTR isnt practical(not alot of people have 100,000$ laying around).
    2013 Subaru STI

  6. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    17
    ya for 100k u can also have the rear lights light up like an amusement park ride. how much do rims cost on their own stock roughly? and how much does a balancing cost?

  7. #36
    Registered User Jbravo_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    102
    The stock GTR rims or stock WRX rims?
    2013 Subaru STI

  8. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    17
    sorry wrx rims for the limited (idk if there is a rim diff)

  9. #38
    Registered User Jbravo_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    102
    Ive seen anywhere from 700-1800 depending on use. Im assuming your talking about the 2015 wrx?
    2013 Subaru STI

  10. #39
    zax
    zax is offline
    \_(ツ)_/ zax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Neverland Ranch, Maryland
    Posts
    12,678
    I Support ClubWRX I Support ClubWRX
    All I'm saying is that a RWD application that transfers power (depending on wheelslip) will not be better than a system that is designed as a permanent slip in inclement conditions. For performance applications, the ATTESSA approach has obvious superiority, but not greatly over applications like Subaru's DCCD and Mitsubishi's SAWC-AYC

    Also, this
    Wow, so much misinformation in this thread
    was not directed at you Jbravo_AK
    2015 CWP WRX STi ... But how did I get roped back into an EJ motor?!
    Zax's utterly unimaginably stock 2015 STi build thread
    Zax's Shaggin' Wagon Build Thread Now tuned for 99% pure Unicorn Jizz!

    Zach | Moderator -- Mid-Atlantic States, Tech & Modifying & General Repairs
    Rollin' with the Bugeye Mafia #302 | N.E.R.D. Subject Zero
    Facebook me here

    Your Mid-A local board: http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/mid-atlantic-states/

  11. #40
    Registered User Jbravo_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    102
    I'll agree with that zax plus if i put 60K more into my car it would be a beast of a car.
    2013 Subaru STI

  12. #41
    \_(ツ)_/ Rambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Denial
    Posts
    4,821
    I Support ClubWRX
    I've driven both of my Subarus up to their max ground clearance in snow without issue. Both had a full set of studless snow tires.

    The WRX AWD system in the manual transmission cars is very primitive due to its purely mechanical torque distribution via a viscous center differential. Despite (or because of) that, it remains very capable in low-traction environments, often besting its direct competition which typically have FWD-based AWD systems. The 2015s haven't been out long enough to see how Subaru's braking "torque vectoring" system affects winter driving.

    The automatic transmission vehicles have a more sophisticated electronic center differential akin the DCCD clutch pack in the STI. In practice, I can feel more of a torque shift longitudinally with the electronic clutch, but both the electronic and viscous-based AWD systems performed equally in snowy environments.

    In my experience, both of my Subarus were only limited by ground clearance in navigating snowy roads. My Outback, with its taller ride height, navigated deeper snow than the WRX, but both passed stuck Jeeps. Of course, in all cases the cars had snow tires, and I was driving cautiously, choosing the easiest path through the snow.

    I did do a hill start test last winter. We had about 8" of fresh snow on about a 6% paved grade. Each vehicle started at the bottom, and tried to get to the top.
    • Honda Insight (all-seasons) - Made about 1/3rd of the way up before traction control kicked it and started spinning the tires. Made it slightly higher by starting over with no TC, but still got stuck.
    • Subaru Outback (snow tires) - Drove to the top confidently with no slip or side-to-side plowing. No problems turning around and driving down either.
    • Ford Escape (snow tires) - Made about 3/4s of the way up before getting stuck. Front wheels spun, rear wheels stuttered intermittently.
    • Honda Ridgeline (all seasons) - Drove to the top confidently with some very minor wheel slip. All differentials manually electronically locked via button.
    • BMW X5 (all seasons) - Drove to the top confidently with no noticeable slip. Very good control on the way back down with "hill decent control" enabled.
    Last edited by Rambo; 07-10-2014 at 12:02 PM.
    Isaac -- 2003 WRX sedan Stg II - Gave its life for mine 6/2013.
    2007 Outback 3.0R wagon
    Proud owner of a N.E.R.D, Member 1.3810-23

    He who shall be last, shall be sideways and smiling... - Jeremy Clarkson

  13. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    17
    thats awesome to hear, I bought the CVT and was hoping that the auto would be a better buy than the manual for that reason alone
    Quote Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
    I've driven both of my Subarus up to their max ground clearance in snow without issue. Both had a full set of studless snow tires.

    The WRX AWD system in the manual transmission cars is very primitive due to its purely mechanical torque distribution via a viscous center differential. Despite (or because of) that, it remains very capable in low-traction environments, often besting its direct competition which typically have FWD-based AWD systems. The 2015s haven't been out long enough to see how Subaru's braking "torque vectoring" system affects winter driving.

    The automatic transmission vehicles have a more sophisticated electronic center differential akin the DCCD clutch pack in the STI. In practice, I can feel more of a torque shift longitudinally with the electronic clutch, but both the electronic and viscous-based AWD systems performed equally in snowy environments.

    In my experience, both of my Subarus were only limited by ground clearance in navigating snowy roads. My Outback, with its taller ride height, navigated deeper snow than the WRX, but both passed stuck Jeeps. Of course, in all cases the cars had snow tires, and I was driving cautiously, choosing the easiest path through the snow.

    I did do a hill start test last winter. We had about 8" of fresh snow on about a 6% paved grade. Each vehicle started at the bottom, and tried to get to the top.
    • Honda Insight (all-seasons) - Made about 1/3rd of the way up before traction control kicked it and started spinning the tires. Made it slightly higher by starting over with no TC, but still got stuck.
    • Subaru Outback (snow tires) - Drove to the top confidently with no slip or side-to-side plowing. No problems turning around and driving down either.
    • Ford Escape (snow tires) - Made about 3/4s of the way up before getting stuck. Front wheels spun, rear wheels stuttered intermittently.
    • Honda Ridgeline (all seasons) - Drove to the top confidently with some very minor wheel slip. All differentials manually electronically locked via button.
    • BMW X5 (all seasons) - Drove to the top confidently with no noticeable slip. Very good control on the way back down with "hill decent control" enabled.

  14. #43
    Registered User cogito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    333
    I personally like two sets for the WRX, dedicated winters Blizzak WS-70's/Steelies and the stock rims/Dunlaps for summer. I was impressed with the WRX handling in snow.... with "snow tires"....for what it is. My ford Fx4 was of course superior in clearance/overall snow performance, but it's built for serious off roading. The WRX equipped correctly will not disappoint, just keep in perspective what you're trying to accomplish in snow. Over a foot of snow..... doubtful.
    2013 WRX Dark Grey Hatch
    1974 Datsun 260z Stroker

  15. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    7
    My experience has been that snow tires make more difference than AWD in really messy snow, but AWD will be better than FWD on the same tires, and both will outperform RWD in a like-like tire setting. AWD only really matters when you've got your foot on the gas, at all other times you're just relying on the grip from the rubber on the four contact patches.

  16. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Shoopster View Post
    Montreal. Snow tires. My first winter with a Subaru and I didn't shovel even once.
    So I just bought myself a very expensive snow removal vehicle? I hope so, last winter we had 2' of snow (what 60cm?) consistently on and off. Luckily we get mostly powder so it's not hard at all to remove but it would be effortless with the car

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •