Keeping turbo running after running?
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This is a discussion on Keeping turbo running after running? within the New Member Hangout forums, part of the Community - Meet other Enthusiasts category; Ive heard people saying that you have to keep your car on a while after youve been driving (never owned ...

  1. #1
    Registered User WrxRick's Avatar
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    Keeping turbo running after running?

    Ive heard people saying that you have to keep your car on a while after youve been driving (never owned a turbo car), normally or running the car hard. Is this true? I will be running a stock turbo, and wasnt sure. Should I invest in a Turbo Timer?

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  3. #2
    Moderator   Sasquatch's Avatar
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    I believe this is only need for some oil cooled only turbos. Ours are water and oil cooled. No cool down needed.

    I have gotten in the possibly unnecessary habit of driving around at slower speeds for a mile or two after coming off an extended highway drive. This lets all of the temperatures equalize before shutting down.

    My opinion? No timer.

  4. #3
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    Turbo Timer is not needed for the stock turbo.

  5. #4
    Registered User TurnWRX's Avatar
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    yep most people don't need tt's on their wrx's. However, the Blitz dc turbo timer has a neat little feature where it includes a boost gauge feature in it which everbody likes to get. However x2, the boost gauge isn't very accurate

  6. #5
    Moderator YBNormal07's Avatar
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    Nope..not need. For daily driving, and even moderate to hard driving, a timer really isn't necessary for the impreza turbo platform. But....(isn't there always one of those), it's always a good idea, turbo or NA, to allow your engine time to equilibrate on temps after some hard driving. Just common sense. As posted above, just don't be into boost and then suddenly stop and turn it off. Or go for extended periods in boost (track days, autox, etc.) without letting your engine cool off prior to turning off.
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    Registered User WrxRick's Avatar
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    Alright thank you for all your posts. I still have one question, however.
    Why is it that the turbo must cool with the car on? Wouldnt it cool when the car was turned off?

  8. #7
    Registered User Kevlar's Avatar
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    The problem comes from when the turbo is really hot. The oil (and coolant with some turbos) circulating through it cools it off. Shut the engine off, and the oil (and coolant) are no longer circulating, so all the heat pent up in the turbo can damage it. Kind of like with computers. When you shut your computer down, the fans stop with the computer, so hot components (CPU, GPU, etc) can get damaged because the heat, which is still present, is no longer being pulled away (did you know that they actually make timers for computers that keep the fans going for a few minutes after you shut down? ).

  9. #8
    Registered User WrxRick's Avatar
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    Haha interesting...maybe instead of a BOV I should invest in that lol...haha, maybe neither.
    Thanks for answering my question

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    Registered User bklSTi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevlar
    did you know that they actually make timers for computers that keep the fans going for a few minutes after you shut down? .

    Hummmm....didnt know that. ..thats kinda funny..
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  11. #10
    Registered User WrxRick's Avatar
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    So after I lightly run the car, put it in boost a few times, how long should I keep it running? About 2 minutes?

  12. #11
    Banned dark_rex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrxRick
    So after I lightly run the car, put it in boost a few times, how long should I keep it running? About 2 minutes?
    maybe a minute. if i run it hard, and heppen to hit the redlight before my house, i usually count that as enough.

    run synthetic oil. it's less likely to cook and cake.

  13. #12
    Moderator YBNormal07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevlar
    The problem comes from when the turbo is really hot. The oil (and coolant with some turbos) circulating through it cools it off. Shut the engine off, and the oil (and coolant) are no longer circulating, so all the heat pent up in the turbo can damage it. Kind of like with computers. When you shut your computer down, the fans stop with the computer, so hot components (CPU, GPU, etc) can get damaged because the heat, which is still present, is no longer being pulled away (did you know that they actually make timers for computers that keep the fans going for a few minutes after you shut down? ).
    Kinda sorta---the actual problem is due to coking of the oil. It heats up then cakes on, as dark-rex mentioned. This will eventually cause problems with your turbo, mainly due to restricted oil flow and subsequent bearing and seal failure. Don't let these issues scare you too much. Our turbo design is very robust. As long as you wait a minute before shutting down after being in boost, you'll be fine. For everyday driving, it's just a regular car..shut it down and get out.
    tEh PriUs=teH faSTah!@@!
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  14. #13
    Registered User Kevlar's Avatar
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    Yeah, I was thinking about it today and realized I didn't point out how the heat is a problem because it causes the oil to coke. Solidified oil in your turbo = BAD . But yeah, apparently the design of the turbo/cooling system in the WRX makes it so it isn't a problem (something about how stuff keeps flowing for a while due to heat and the turbo positioning? I don't remember all the details). Just let it cool off for about a minute, especially if you've been driving hard, just to be safe.

  15. #14
    Banned dark_rex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YBNormal07
    Kinda sorta---the actual problem is due to coking of the oil. It heats up then cakes on, as dark-rex mentioned. This will eventually cause problems with your turbo, mainly due to restricted oil flow and subsequent bearing and seal failure. Don't let these issues scare you too much. Our turbo design is very robust. As long as you wait a minute before shutting down after being in boost, you'll be fine. For everyday driving, it's just a regular car..shut it down and get out.

    well said.


  16. #15
    Toboggan T0rque's Avatar
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    My opinion is that a 100 dollar electronic device is a cheap piece of extra security. I really dont want to buy a turbo if I dont want to so letting it cool down after being driven cant do it anymore harm then just shutting it off so I opted for the turbo timer.....


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