Conversation Between jennsfootprints and wrxgc

Conversation Between jennsfootprints and wrxgc

4 Visitor Messages

  1. The two biggest changes I noticed were that my spine straightened a little bit. As I'm 6'4", it's been tough to keep good posture, but as my form changed in running, my back had to pick up some of the slack. My speed increased quite a bit - I dropped 37 minutes off of my marathon time. Running "barefoot" isn't a cure all answer to running, but it certainly (in my eyes) fixes alot of the common ailments that plague recreational runners and sideline them from staying fit and feeling healthy.
  2. Well, my doctor would kill me trying this method out. She doesn't like it when I walk around barefoot in my own house let alone outside. I'm a diabetic so have to watch out for my feet. I was just curious. It sounds cool but I think I'll stick to my thick soled shoes. I've finally got my form down pat (after visiting with a physical therapist for a knee injury) and my core is fairly strong or stronger than it was. Hopefully I can start taking my dogs out with me soon. Did you notice a difference in your speed at all? After you adjusted of course.
  3. your eyes become remarkably good at spotting sharp objects and not stepping on them. Your feet become tougher too. The biggest adjustment is switching from landing on your heel to landing on your forefoot, which involves quite a bit of strength in your calf muscles. I spent about 2 weeks running 3 miles a day, 4 days a week to adjust, then jumped into marathon training after. My calves were definitely very sore at some points and I should have given myself more adjustment time, but I'd suggest just listening to your body and deciding when it feels right. Just be careful not to overdo it right away if you try it.
  4. How on earth do you run with those things? Theres way too many rocks that would kill me running in barefoot shoes. How long did it take you to adapt to them?
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