Canon DSLR help
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This is a discussion on Canon DSLR help within the Member Show-Off & Photography forums, part of the Community - Meet other Enthusiasts category; I'm using the Canon 300d (AKA digital rebel) and I'm having issues with getting a reasonable amount of blue colors ...

  1. #1
    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Canon DSLR help

    I'm using the Canon 300d (AKA digital rebel) and I'm having issues with getting a reasonable amount of blue colors in my photos. The sky is usually really washed out and white, unless its really late at night. I can sometimes get descent blues, depending on how much sky I'm shooting. But I can't manage to get the same results if the area I'm shooting is somewhat dark. The sky ends up looking white, or the area I'm mostly shooting is way too dark.

    Any suggestions on settings to change in the camera. I'm not the master of photoshop some of you are, so I'd rather not get into trying to overlap two photos on to each other, etc. Besides, I don't know that my version of photoshop will allow for that (photoshop elements).

    Any help/suggestions would be appreciated.
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

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    Registered User c00lbeans's Avatar
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    Thats normal. There's no magic camera setting that can make your sky look great and keep the subject looking good. Dont shoot things in shadows if you want a blue sky, either expose for the shadows and go for a blown out sky look or expose for highlights and have a nice contrasty photo with a nice sky. A polarizer filter will help, but it all depends on the amount of light on your subject, time of day, and haziness of the sky. There's a lot of variables but, shoot late afternoon or morning, on a clear day with some nice clouds with a well lit subject. The sky is least hazy/smoggy right after it rains.

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    Registered User $lick Rick's Avatar
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    ^^^ good advice

    a sort of chater route might be to use a warm polarizing filter and a filler flash

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    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    Jim,

    One thing you can try is using the camera in Av mode (aperture priority), exposing for ambient light (sky) and use fill flash. I understand that not everyone likes using flash, but, when fill flash is used to balance the lighting you will be hard pressed to tell it's not natural lighting. Unless you shoot your car and the side reflector sparkles. This method works great for people photos.

    Go to the Canon Digital Learning Center for more information:

    http://photoworkshop.com/canon/

    Also, refer to your manual for Av mode and fill flash operations.

    Another method I use is in Manual mode, take a meter reading of the ground and then the sky and split the difference. When metering the ground, green grass or anything near to gray in reflectance will do. Or you can carry a gray card with you in your bag.

    And most important of all, bracket your exposures. +/=/- your aperture setting for those shots that you're realy not sure about. You could also vary either your shutter speed or ISO, depending on the effect you want to achieve.

    Shoot lots, analyze the EXIF info and compare the images so you know what affect you are having on the image. Breezebrowser is great for this as it allows you to compare images side by side and has other features that I use a lot.

    Peace,

    Curtis

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    "sitting in the corner in Rick Roll timeout" chanwahyaoh's Avatar
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    You can also invest in some graduated neutral density filters.
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    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c00lbeans View Post
    Thats normal. There's no magic camera setting that can make your sky look great and keep the subject looking good. Dont shoot things in shadows if you want a blue sky, either expose for the shadows and go for a blown out sky look or expose for highlights and have a nice contrasty photo with a nice sky. A polarizer filter will help, but it all depends on the amount of light on your subject, time of day, and haziness of the sky. There's a lot of variables but, shoot late afternoon or morning, on a clear day with some nice clouds with a well lit subject. The sky is least hazy/smoggy right after it rains.
    Yeah, I wasn't expecting a 'push this button and make awesome shots' button. But I was hoping for some internal settings that I could change to allow for more reaction to blue skies.

    I would have used a polarizer, except the lens I used won't fit my polarizer (trying not to invest more in the kit lens that the camera came with).

    And it was late in the day (5pm, sundown was around 7pm), with the sun to the 4/5 o'clock position from where I was shooting. It was just a bad situation (really dark area near by, down in a lot of tree cover, with a fairly bright sky).

    I have just heard about people saying the stock settings for the D rebel are off from what most people would use as their default. So I was hoping there was something I could slighly adjust before taking shots to bring out the blue. Other contrasts are good, just something about blue that doesn't show up well.
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

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    Admin - Scooby Hooligan

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    u could shoot the shot in manual, and expose more the sky
    for example say shot is 125 @ f5.6 at 4pm
    shoot at 125 @ f8 or f11 , would def make the darks ..darker and pull out the sky
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    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurbeauxREX View Post
    Jim,

    One thing you can try is using the camera in Av mode (aperture priority), exposing for ambient light (sky) and use fill flash. I understand that not everyone likes using flash, but, when fill flash is used to balance the lighting you will be hard pressed to tell it's not natural lighting. Unless you shoot your car and the side reflector sparkles. This method works great for people photos.

    Go to the Canon Digital Learning Center for more information:

    http://photoworkshop.com/canon/

    Also, refer to your manual for Av mode and fill flash operations.

    Another method I use is in Manual mode, take a meter reading of the ground and then the sky and split the difference. When metering the ground, green grass or anything near to gray in reflectance will do. Or you can carry a gray card with you in your bag.

    And most important of all, bracket your exposures. +/=/- your aperture setting for those shots that you're realy not sure about. You could also vary either your shutter speed or ISO, depending on the effect you want to achieve.

    Shoot lots, analyze the EXIF info and compare the images so you know what affect you are having on the image. Breezebrowser is great for this as it allows you to compare images side by side and has other features that I use a lot.

    Peace,

    Curtis
    Thanks Curtis,

    I typically use Av mode only. I'm not too big on full manual (too much of a beginner I suppose?), but I dislike auto mode. I have used the fill flash (only have the on-board flash) with some benefit, but this area was too large for that I think...probably a distance of 100-125 feet to the main target from where I was.

    And I did try shooting with a little over and a little under exposure too, to see how it came out. I think this was just a bad situation to try and shoot the shot and get enough exposure for the focal point, without washing out the sky.

    What do you mean about analyse my EXIF info? Not sure I'm familiar with the term.

    I'll have to pick up (download) breezebrowser, I assume that's freeware? That'll help me a lot, because switching back and forth from images in photoshop doesn't really allow me to compare the two as best as I think I should be able to do.

    And I'll check out the link you provided.

    Thanks to everyone for their input. I like to think I take descent pictures, but I know I can always improve my technique.
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

  10. #9
    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Maybe examples of the shots I took would help explain my dilema. Here are two shots, different exposures. And the sky is blown out in one, and everything else seems OK. And the other the sky is an OK blue, while the rest is way too dark in my opinion.

    Not sure that this helps with anything, but it might shed some light (no pun intended) on the situation I was shooting in.
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

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    Admin - Scooby Hooligan

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    ok well your gonna lose the sky since the camera is exposing for the foreground and waterfall , and unless u have serious lighting to compensate for the shadow of the waterfall / foreground , i'm afraid yer sky will be washed out (over-exposed)

    1. a solution would be to have a canon 540EZ or 550EX flash to add light to the foreground and the person, this would help pull in the sky above the waterfall
    Last edited by Weasel 555; 11-05-2006 at 04:36 PM.
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  12. #11
    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weasel 555 View Post
    ok well your gonna lose the sky since the camera is exposing for the foreground and waterfall , and unless u have serious lighting to compensate for the shadow of the waterfall / foreground , i'm afraid yer sky will be washed out (over-exposed)

    1. a solution would be to have a canon 540EZ or 550EX flash to add light to the foreground and the person, this would help pull in the sky above the waterfall
    That's what I figured. I'll have to see if anyone wants to get a flash for me for my birthday or Christmas. Being a poor college kid, I definitely can't spring for it on my own. But I have wanted a real flash for it, for a while now.
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

  13. #12
    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beastcivic View Post
    Thanks Curtis,

    What do you mean about analyse my EXIF info? Not sure I'm familiar with the term.

    I'll have to pick up (download) breezebrowser, I assume that's freeware?
    EXIF data is embedded into the digital file, containing camera make/model, ISO, AP, Shutter, date/time, etc, etc, etc. used to make that image. By looking at the images while comparing the camera settings used you can learn what changes have what effect on the image.

    This is the Full EXIF data from an image I shot last Friday as seen in Breezebrowser:

    File: HD2W0001.JPG
    File size: 4,838KB
    Image Serial Number: 000-0001
    Image counter: 33902
    Camera Model: Canon EOS-1D Mark II
    Camera serial number: 0000207614
    Firmware: Firmware Version 1.2.4
    Owner: Curtis Bosarge
    Date/Time: 2006:11:03 13:50:26
    Shutter speed: 1/200 sec
    Aperture: 14
    Exposure mode: Manual
    Flash: Off
    Metering mode: Partial
    Drive mode: Continuous (low): frame 1
    ISO: 200
    Lens: 140 to 400mm
    Focal length: 400mm
    AF mode: AI Servo AF
    Image size: 3504 x 2336
    Rotation: none
    Image quality: Fine
    White balance: Auto
    Color matrix 3: sRGB high-chroma
    Color space: sRGB
    Saturation: High2
    Contrast: 0
    Sharpness level: 3
    Tone: Normal
    Gamma: Standard
    Custom Functions:
    CFn 1: Viewfinder display on during exposure
    CFn 2: No exposure without CF card
    CFn 8: Top LCD panel: ISO, Back LCD panel: Remaining shots
    CFn 10: AF point illumination: Brighter
    CFn 13: 11 AF points, Spot metering: Active AF point
    CFn 14: E-TTL II Average
    CFn 15: 2nd-curtain flash synchronization
    CFn 17: Expand AF activation area to 7 AF points
    CFn 18: Assist button switches to registered AF point
    CFn 20: AI Servo tracking: Fast

    Not all of that info is important, but qiuite a bit is. The cameras I shoot have Custom Functions and preferred settings for saturation, contrast, sharpness, tone, etc. Your D-reb may have similar adjustments pre-programmed and selectable through a dial setting (I'm not sure). NOTE: None of this has much to do with the dilemma you posted about. I'm just expounding on EXIF data...anyway.


    Unfortunately, Breezebrowser is not freeware, but, they do have a trial version for download. Here's the page link for a description of the software: http://www.breezesys.com/BreezeBrowser/features.htm

    Breezebrowser Pro price is $69.95. Try the evaluation version first.

    Peace,

    Curtis

  14. #13
    Moderator beastcivic's Avatar
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    Ah, understood. Thanks for the info. Its always appreciated!

    Quote Originally Posted by TurbeauxREX View Post
    EXIF data is embedded into the digital file, containing camera make/model, ISO, AP, Shutter, date/time, etc, etc, etc. used to make that image. By looking at the images while comparing the camera settings used you can learn what changes have what effect on the image.

    This is the Full EXIF data from an image I shot last Friday as seen in Breezebrowser:

    File: HD2W0001.JPG
    File size: 4,838KB
    Image Serial Number: 000-0001
    Image counter: 33902
    Camera Model: Canon EOS-1D Mark II
    Camera serial number: 0000207614
    Firmware: Firmware Version 1.2.4
    Owner: Curtis Bosarge
    Date/Time: 2006:11:03 13:50:26
    Shutter speed: 1/200 sec
    Aperture: 14
    Exposure mode: Manual
    Flash: Off
    Metering mode: Partial
    Drive mode: Continuous (low): frame 1
    ISO: 200
    Lens: 140 to 400mm
    Focal length: 400mm
    AF mode: AI Servo AF
    Image size: 3504 x 2336
    Rotation: none
    Image quality: Fine
    White balance: Auto
    Color matrix 3: sRGB high-chroma
    Color space: sRGB
    Saturation: High2
    Contrast: 0
    Sharpness level: 3
    Tone: Normal
    Gamma: Standard
    Custom Functions:
    CFn 1: Viewfinder display on during exposure
    CFn 2: No exposure without CF card
    CFn 8: Top LCD panel: ISO, Back LCD panel: Remaining shots
    CFn 10: AF point illumination: Brighter
    CFn 13: 11 AF points, Spot metering: Active AF point
    CFn 14: E-TTL II Average
    CFn 15: 2nd-curtain flash synchronization
    CFn 17: Expand AF activation area to 7 AF points
    CFn 18: Assist button switches to registered AF point
    CFn 20: AI Servo tracking: Fast

    Not all of that info is important, but qiuite a bit is. The cameras I shoot have Custom Functions and preferred settings for saturation, contrast, sharpness, tone, etc. Your D-reb may have similar adjustments pre-programmed and selectable through a dial setting (I'm not sure). NOTE: None of this has much to do with the dilemma you posted about. I'm just expounding on EXIF data...anyway.


    Unfortunately, Breezebrowser is not freeware, but, they do have a trial version for download. Here's the page link for a description of the software: http://www.breezesys.com/BreezeBrowser/features.htm

    Breezebrowser Pro price is $69.95. Try the evaluation version first.

    Peace,

    Curtis
    -Jim

    '02 Platinum Silver WRX sedan w/roof rack...bone stock. Ok, now that's a lie.

    GO HOKIES!!!!!!!!!

  15. #14
    Registered User c00lbeans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurbeauxREX View Post
    EXIF data is embedded into the digital file, containing camera make/model, ISO, AP, Shutter, date/time, etc, etc, etc. used to make that image. By looking at the images while comparing the camera settings used you can learn what changes have what effect on the image.

    This is the Full EXIF data from an image I shot last Friday as seen in Breezebrowser:

    File: HD2W0001.JPG
    File size: 4,838KB
    Image Serial Number: 000-0001
    Image counter: 33902
    Camera Model: Canon EOS-1D Mark II
    Camera serial number: 0000207614
    Firmware: Firmware Version 1.2.4
    Owner: Curtis Bosarge
    Date/Time: 2006:11:03 13:50:26
    Shutter speed: 1/200 sec
    Aperture: 14
    Exposure mode: Manual
    Flash: Off
    Metering mode: Partial
    Drive mode: Continuous (low): frame 1
    ISO: 200
    Lens: 140 to 400mm
    Focal length: 400mm
    AF mode: AI Servo AF
    Image size: 3504 x 2336
    Rotation: none
    Image quality: Fine
    White balance: Auto
    Color matrix 3: sRGB high-chroma
    Color space: sRGB
    Saturation: High2
    Contrast: 0
    Sharpness level: 3
    Tone: Normal
    Gamma: Standard
    Custom Functions:
    CFn 1: Viewfinder display on during exposure
    CFn 2: No exposure without CF card
    CFn 8: Top LCD panel: ISO, Back LCD panel: Remaining shots
    CFn 10: AF point illumination: Brighter
    CFn 13: 11 AF points, Spot metering: Active AF point
    CFn 14: E-TTL II Average
    CFn 15: 2nd-curtain flash synchronization
    CFn 17: Expand AF activation area to 7 AF points
    CFn 18: Assist button switches to registered AF point
    CFn 20: AI Servo tracking: Fast

    Not all of that info is important, but qiuite a bit is. The cameras I shoot have Custom Functions and preferred settings for saturation, contrast, sharpness, tone, etc. Your D-reb may have similar adjustments pre-programmed and selectable through a dial setting (I'm not sure). NOTE: None of this has much to do with the dilemma you posted about. I'm just expounding on EXIF data...anyway.


    Unfortunately, Breezebrowser is not freeware, but, they do have a trial version for download. Here's the page link for a description of the software: http://www.breezesys.com/BreezeBrowser/features.htm

    Breezebrowser Pro price is $69.95. Try the evaluation version first.

    Peace,

    Curtis
    Why are you using sRGB???????

  16. #15
    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c00lbeans View Post
    Why are you using sRGB???????

    I shoot large-fine jpg due to the high volume and my disdain for spending a lot of time in post processing; hence, no RAW for me. sRGB is required by the printer that I use through exposuremanager for on-line sales.

    Also, it seems that everything I read on camera setup (1D-series Canon), sRGB was the recommended color space. This includes set up info from Sports Illustrated and hundreds of pro sport and PJ shooters.

    Other than the aforementioned, I don't really have a reason to shoot in sRGB. And, I'm the first to admit that I'm handicapped when it comes to digital knowledge. Photography; I know a little. Ones & zeroes are a bit of a mistery, but I am willing to learn. If this is an area of knowledge for you, I would appreciate your input, c00lbeans.

    Peace,

    Curtis

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