Having a problem with fast shutter speed
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This is a discussion on Having a problem with fast shutter speed within the Member Show-Off & Photography forums, part of the Community - Meet other Enthusiasts category; From what I've read, when using a high shutter speed the appeture should be low. My camera will go as ...

  1. #1
    Registered User maximum's Avatar
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    Having a problem with fast shutter speed

    From what I've read, when using a high shutter speed the appeture should be low. My camera will go as low as F2.8 and the pictures are still almost completely dark.
    Is there anything I can do about this short of buying an external flash?

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  3. #2
    "sitting in the corner in Rick Roll timeout" chanwahyaoh's Avatar
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    What camera? If you have a digital SLR, then you can bump up the ISO.
    maybe post some examples too
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    Registered User c00lbeans's Avatar
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    SLOW THE SHUTTER SPEED DOWN

    There is a balance between shutter and aperture and even iso. in basic day light at F16 your shutter speed will be 1/100 at 100ISO(basicaly F16 at shutter speed = to ISO speed)
    F16 is 5 stop darker then 2.8 so at 2.8 your shutter speed will be 1/3200 for a good exposure. riase the ISO or find brighter light like a sunny day with snow and you can use faster shutter speeds. anything above 1/500 should work for stoping motion. Flashes wont work with a shutter speed faster then 1/250 on canon and 1/500 on nikons so forget about using flashes. unless you put it in high speed sync mode but that still dostn work that well.

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    ^^^^^ what he said

    Also...what are you trying to shoot and in what kind of ambient lighting?
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    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c00lbeans
    SLOW THE SHUTTER SPEED DOWN

    There is a balance between shutter and aperture and even iso. in basic day light at F16 your shutter speed will be 1/100 at 100ISO(basicaly F16 at shutter speed = to ISO speed)
    F16 is 5 stop darker then 2.8 so at 2.8 your shutter speed will be 1/3200 for a good exposure. riase the ISO or find brighter light like a sunny day with snow and you can use faster shutter speeds. anything above 1/500 should work for stoping motion. Flashes wont work with a shutter speed faster then 1/250 on canon and 1/500 on nikons so forget about using flashes. unless you put it in high speed sync mode but that still dostn work that well.
    Damn, c00lbeans, how old are you?

    This takes me back ~30 years to my first K1000 Pentax. Ahhh, film. The old days.

    Very good explanation, btw.

    Peace,

    Curtis

  7. #6
    Registered User c00lbeans's Avatar
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    Im 20. 21 in a month woot. I'm good at math so F stops shutter speeds and guide numbers are way easy for me to learn and calculate.

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    Registered User maximum's Avatar
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    Im not using an SLR, its the Panasonic FZ-30. I was at an indoor skatepark where the ambient lighting isn't so great. Can you explain to me in layman's terms what I have to do again?

  9. #8
    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maximum
    Im not using an SLR, its the Panasonic FZ-30. I was at an indoor skatepark where the ambient lighting isn't so great. Can you explain to me in layman's terms what I have to do again?
    I hope this doesn't come off sounding like "Do a search", but, have you read the manual?
    I just read the review at dpreview.com, which gives a thorough listing of the camera's features, pros & cons, etc. You can go here for information on the camera's functionality and features:

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz30/

    In a nutshell, the ISO range (per the info at the link above) is limited to 80, 100, 200 & 400. Not a lot to work with in low lighting, even with the f2.8 lens. Another thing to realize, the lens has a variable aperature range, dependent upon the chosen focal length; 2.8 on the wide end and 3.7 when extended. Also, the built in flash is limited to ~7.0 Meters (~25' or so). An external flash will help with range; however, will not do anything for the characteristic noise related to the sensor in this camera. Of course, the use of Noise Ninja will help improve your final edited images in this area, but, it is a band-aide, not a cure.

    As so far as expounding on the excellent info that c00lbeans offered previously, all I can tell you, is if that is not clear, the easiest way to learn is to set the camera to full-program mode and observe the EXIF info imbedded into the files. This info, combined with viewing the resultant image is a visual indication of what is occuring at varying light settings (ISO/F-stop/shutter speed). It is great way to learn, then emaulate in setting the camera to Manual mode and controlling your exposure to a greater degree. But, I go back to my earlier statement:

    Use the camera within the range it is best suited to operate. This will result in cleaner, better exposed images and whole lot less frustration.

    The FZ-30 looks like a great camera to use outdoors in bright light. Indoors is apparently not its happiest place to work.

    Peace,

    Curtis

    DP REVIEW CONCLUSION: Panasonic FZ-30

    Conclusion - Pros
    Very high resolution and detail capture throughout the zoom range
    Sharp results
    Good, natural color
    Superb 12x optical zoom
    Effective image stabilization
    Excellent handling - much improved over the FZ20
    Comprehensive range of controls and improved control layout
    Very fast operation
    Well designed menu system
    Nice handling and control layout
    Easy to use
    Excellent screen
    Very usable EVF
    Autofocus illuminator
    Powerful flash
    Good battery life
    Program shift
    TIFF & RAW modes
    Improved movie modes
    Fast startup, fast focus

    Conclusion - Cons
    Noise is even an issue at ISO 80, a real problem at ISO 400 or in very low light
    Very occasional exposure problems
    Max aperture at long end of zoom only F3.7
    Limited dynamic range, highlight clipping in JPEGs
    Pointless RAW converter produces worse results than JPEGs
    Focus at extreme telephoto sometimes hunts, occasionally misses
    Images can look a little soft viewed at 100%

    Overall conclusion
    In many ways the FZ30 is everything the FZ20 could (and maybe should) have been, and Panasonic must be applauded for implementing a huge raft of handling and control improvements, as well as speeding up overall performance. On the other hand you cannot help but wonder how much better this camera would be with a less noisy chip - the 7MP Sony CCD used in models such as the SD500 springs to mind (not that Panasonic would be caught dead using a Sony sensor of course!).

    On the positive side this is as near as you'll get to a digital SLR with the equivalent image-stabilized lenses, without the cost or bulk, though also without the low light capabilities. Handling and control particularly have been improved almost beyond recognition, and for this alone the FZ30 can be considered a worthwhile upgrade from its predecessor.

    But if the FZ30 represents a quantum leap in terms of handling and control it is little more than a tiny step forward in terms of image quality. Yes, there's more detail, but there's also more noise and a less effective image stabilization system. If you want a camera that can beat all the 5MP super zooms (including the FZ20), you'll be happy, but if you actually need the additional pixels to produce larger prints you may well be disappointed - it simply isn't that much better. The one saving grace is that ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) is - with a little tweaking - capable of getting far more out of the FZ30's RAW output than either in-camera JPEGs or RAW files converted using the stunningly useless utility supplied in the box (we have heard rumors that Panasonic is working on a better RAW converter, let's wait and see).

    So, in the end this is a camera that improves on its predecessor in almost every aspect, and one that makes most of the current crop of 5MP super zooms look like toys in comparison, but it's also one that is frustratingly disappointing for anyone looking for a significant improvement in image quality over the (admittedly class-leading) FZ20. Buy one for it's handling, control, features and sheer class, but don't buy one if you want much better image quality than an FZ20 in anything but very good light, as you simply won't get it. A stunning camera, but not a perfect one.

  10. #9
    Registered User c00lbeans's Avatar
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    i wouldnt even try to shoot an indoor skate park unless i wanted panning shots or had wireless flashes set up. use small focal length and try to pan. if the subject is close to you make sure the camera is set to expose the normal ambiant light no mater how slow your shutter has to be(this is called shutter drag, gives a ghostly look to it). then turn the flash on. it will freeze your subject.

    looks like this

  11. #10
    Registered User TurbeauxREX's Avatar
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    You will also need to set the flash or camera (refer to your manual) to Second-Curtain Synch for this to work properly. Otherwise, you may end up with the light/color streaks ahead of your subject.

    Peace,

    Curtis

  12. #11
    Registered User maximum's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurbeauxREX
    You will also need to set the flash or camera (refer to your manual) to Second-Curtain Synch for this to work properly. Otherwise, you may end up with the light/color streaks ahead of your subject.

    Peace,

    Curtis
    If you have a Nikon or Minolta, you might want to look for Rear Curtain Sync.

    BTW, whoever posted 'Sunny 16 rule', it's nice to see something like that in today's almost all-digital world. (About to invest in a 4x5 large format rig... film still does it for me.)

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