Changing brake pads on WRX - Page 2
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This is a discussion on Changing brake pads on WRX within the Maintenance, service, and repair forums, part of the Tutorials & DIY category; Well done. You are home and dry. Replace the tire, and lower the vehicle from the jack stand. Torque the ...

  1. #16
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    10.

    Well done. You are home and dry. Replace the tire, and lower the vehicle from the jack stand. Torque the lug nuts to the specified values.

    Repeat for the other side (do one side at a time).

    -Pace
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p6290092.jpg  

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  3. #17
    Registered User Nexus6's Avatar
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    Red face

    Thats it?
    La Fee Verte
    Subaru 2002 Impreza WRX Sedan

  4. #18
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Nexus6
    Thats it?
    Meaning?

  5. #19
    Registered User BigRich's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    ...awesome illustrations and instructions!

    -- Rich

  6. #20
    Registered User PlatinumWRX's Avatar
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    Pace,

    Why didn't you get your rotors resurfaced?

    -Jim

  7. #21
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    Originally posted by PlatinumWRX
    Pace,

    Why didn't you get your rotors resurfaced?

    -Jim
    They look worse in the photos than they really are; there are no significant contours or ridges. Next time, I will probably just replace everything with an uprated setup. For this time, I just wanted to keep the cost down.

    -Pace

  8. #22
    Registered User Prince Ali's Avatar
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    Thanks for the instruction. I have a basic question. I have never changed my brake pads because I thought the brakes needed to be adjusted. But I'm pretty good with taking stuff on and putting them back on. Are there any adjustments necessary? Will the pedal distance be the same afterward? What about the handbrake adjustment? What is bleeding the brake line?
    Thanks,
    Ali

  9. #23
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Prince Ali
    Thanks for the instruction. I have a basic question. I have never changed my brake pads because I thought the brakes needed to be adjusted. But I'm pretty good with taking stuff on and putting them back on. Are there any adjustments necessary? Will the pedal distance be the same afterward? What about the handbrake adjustment? What is bleeding the brake line?
    Assuming you have not disconnected any part of the closed hydraulic system, nothing will need to be 'adjusted'. After installation, just pump the pedal a few times with the motor running and you'll be good to go. However, if you loosen one of the bleed screws to enable you to push the pistons home, then you will need to bleed air out of the system when the installation is done.

    I don't have much faith in the 'one man' bleed hoses, so I use the tried and tested 'two man' method:

    1. With your car still up on the jack stand and the wheel removed, have a buddy get in the vehicle and start it. (Please make sure it's not in gear when he releases the clutch.)
    2. Remove the cap from the brake fluid reservoir.
    3. Attach a tightly fitting piece of clear hose over the bleed nipple.
    4. Put the other end of the hose in a plastic cup that contains fresh brake fluid. Make sure the end of the hose is submerged.
    5. Open the bleed nipple with your wrench...
    6. ...immediately tell your buddy to push the brake pedal to the floor and hold it there.
    7. Tighten the bleed nipple.
    8. Tell your buddy to release the brake pedal.
    9. Keep an eye on the level of fluid in the reservoir. Top up if necessary.
    10. Repeat 5 through 9 until the fluid coming out is clean and has no air bubbles in it. Can be anywhere from 3 to 10 repetitions depending which parts of the system were disconnected and for how long. If you just loosened the bleed screw, you will probably not do more than 5 reps.

    -Pace
    Last edited by pace; 07-12-2002 at 09:03 AM.

  10. #24
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    Vehicles with drum brakes at the rear sometimes require manual 'adjustment' after installation, but the WRX has disc brakes at all four corners.

    -Pace

  11. #25
    Registered User WRXed's Avatar
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    Incredible write-up/tutorial, Pace! I bet you got all A's in school, didn't you? Don't be shy now, we know you did!
    All those who believe in psychokinesis, raise my hand. - Steven Wright

    Moderator, of the "Super" persuasion

  12. #26
    Registered User Prince Ali's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot for the clarification.
    Thanks,
    Ali

  13. #27
    Registered User pace's Avatar
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    Originally posted by WRXed
    Incredible write-up/tutorial, Pace! I bet you got all A's in school, didn't you? Don't be shy now, we know you did!
    Awww, shucks.

  14. #28
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    Doesn't the WRX use a separate drum brake unit for the parking brake?
    Chris Perera
    STX WRX

  15. #29
    Moderator GV27's Avatar
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    I Support ClubWRX
    It does. Totally separate so not really involved in this discussion.

    Pace's last bit about making the pistons easier to press by opening the bleed valve is something that should be done every time rather than just if it's tough. Otherwise you run the risk of overflowing the fluid reservoir on the top side, assuming you've kept it topped up to compensate for pad wear. I've also heard that forcing the fluid up stream can cause issues with the ABS system too. I don't remember what that issue is though! Plus it's a good opportunity to bleed any air out of the caliper while making the job easier on yourself.

    Oh, just looked at the instructions again and have a correction - If you use a tube over the bleed valve and make sure you have pressure on the pistons before you crack open the valve, you won't have to bleed the system - just be careful to close the valve before releasing pressure on the pistons so you don't suck any air back into the caliper. Doing it this way gives no opportunity for air to enter the system, so no further bleeding is necessary (unless, of course, it's necessary for other reasons!). If you mess up and see even the tiniest air bubble get sucked in, do the full bleed procedure to be on the safe side.

    C
    "Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it to me." -Jesus

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  16. #30
    Registered User NJSubieTech's Avatar
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    I hate to step into this so late, but there is actually an even easier/faster way to do this job. If you just remove the bottom slide bolt, the caliper will pivot up and you can do the rest of the job as instructed.
    I also like to use a little anti-seize between the ends of the pads and the clips. It cuts down on noise sometimes.

    Personally, Ive never heard of there being a problem with pushing fluid back up into the system. I dont see how it coudl be harmful, seeing as its a pressurized hydrolic system, and youre not generating NEAR the pressure with your hand that you do when you activate the master cylinder with the pedal.

    If youre problem is that youre going to overflow the master cylinder - just get yourself a regular old turkey baster - and suck some of the fluid out as you go...

    If youre problem is that you cant generate the pressure to push the piston back in, and you dont have a C-clamp or a large adjustable wrench to push with, then I would go for cracking the bleeder screw. However, I would then definitely bleed the system - youd have to be pretty slick to crack that screw and not get air in there with just your hand on the caliper....

    Speed safely,

    Joe
    merlin916@aol.com
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