2003 JDM STi Gauge Cluster: Wow! - Page 2
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This is a discussion on 2003 JDM STi Gauge Cluster: Wow! within the Interior Mods forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; Originally posted by Trypsin True eyes are less sensitive to reds, green is the most sensitive color, which is why ...

  1. #16
    Moderator aussieinstlouis's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Trypsin
    True eyes are less sensitive to reds, green is the most sensitive color, which is why night vision is in green. Which is probably why lots of cars come with green dash lights
    The reason for Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) being green is primarily for 2 reasons.
    1. Green Phosphor for CRTs is really cheap.
    2. Lower power generation - to appear the same brightness, you actually have to pump out a lot more red light than you do green. ie 1 watt of green light is as bright (visible) as 10 watts of red light. When you are designing a system to be mounted on your head - you want the lightest weight - if you are only needing 1 watt - it is easier. (this is where photometric as opposed to radiometric units 'normalise' this so that you can compare easily)

    Fighter cockpit displays and HUDs are green precisely because that is where your eyes are most sensitive. They went to great expense to develop a phosphor that is exactly the same wavelength as the eye's max sensitivity.

    The problem with NVGs is that being green light - they ruin your natural night vision. You are using your cones in your eyes which are the high res colour receptors. To get your natural night vision (which takes about 30 minutes to get good) you have to get the lazy rods (which are not colour sensitive, but more responsive in the red end of the spectrum) to start working - so if you are wanting your eyes to be best adapted for night vision and most sensitive, you should use red light, so as not to shut down the rods and not stimulate the cones too much.

    For info - the eyes response to red and bluey- purple light is about the same.

    Sorry for the ramble - have spent a lot of time on this topic and reporting to a military board of inquiry after we lost 2 choppers and 18 guys in an NVG related crash.

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  3. #17
    Registered User Trypsin's Avatar
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    Great reply aussie,
    just to add, the fovea centralis( focal point on the retina) lacks rods altogether, for best night vision one should never look directly at what you want to see rather use your periphrial vision, as you get closer to the edges of the retina the percentage of rods to cones increases. cones do not detect low light situatons efficiently at all. Some birds are equipped only with Rods, this cant see at night at all, and no matter what will not leave the roost after dark. Next time it is night and you are walking down a dark path(stepping stones work best) look strait ahead and you can see the stones, look right at them an they disappear.

  4. #18
    Registered User WRXin''s Avatar
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    Originally posted by Trypsin
    Great reply aussie,
    just to add, the fovea centralis( focal point on the retina) lacks rods altogether, for best night vision one should never look directly at what you want to see rather use your periphrial vision, as you get closer to the edges of the retina the percentage of rods to cones increases. cones do not detect low light situatons efficiently at all. Some birds are equipped only with Rods, this cant see at night at all, and no matter what will not leave the roost after dark. Next time it is night and you are walking down a dark path(stepping stones work best) look strait ahead and you can see the stones, look right at them an they disappear.
    Are you a med student or a doctor Trypsin? I would assume from your screen name -- Trypsin: the enzyme that breaks down protien -- that you are. I got excited when I saw you mention the fovea centralis. My friend is a med student at UT Med in Houston, and that's one of the things that he taught me while we were studying. I'm not a med student myself, but I catch a few things here and there
    Fahd

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  5. #19
    Registered User Bask Oner's Avatar
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  6. #20
    Registered User dookiebob's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Trypsin
    Great reply aussie,
    just to add, the fovea centralis( focal point on the retina) lacks rods altogether, for best night vision one should never look directly at what you want to see rather use your periphrial vision, as you get closer to the edges of the retina the percentage of rods to cones increases. cones do not detect low light situatons efficiently at all. Some birds are equipped only with Rods, this cant see at night at all, and no matter what will not leave the roost after dark. Next time it is night and you are walking down a dark path(stepping stones work best) look strait ahead and you can see the stones, look right at them an they disappear.
    This is a great reply as well, as most of the information is correct. Rods are the "lazy" receptors in the retina, as they are unable to process color and have relatively low acuity. Thus, red or green will register just as some shade of b&w to the rods. This is evidenced by persons with complete color blindness--usually caused by a mutation in the DNA coding for the cones of the retina.

    Cones are more concentrated at the center of a person's vision, the fovea. They are very sensitive, and they detect color. Thus, any red or green that you see has to be processed by cones as well as rods.

    The idea about seeing the stones at night is not really all true... since everyone has two eyes (minus you pirates out there), the focal points in each eye are slightly different. Thus you may be hitting more rods in one eye than the other.

    BTW, I am a med student. I can't believe that my medical education on the eye is first useful on an internet forum...
    I am the Anti-rice.

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  7. #21
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    what works well with red is since rods pick up light values rather than color, red is a relatively cool color it is very easy on the eyes. and also red is easy for the cones in your eyes as they pick up color. if we were talkinga bout just plain saturated blues and reds it really wouldnt matter, btu since they are illuminated, the blue has distinctly more white than the red does

  8. #22
    Moderator aussieinstlouis's Avatar
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    Human factors engineering can get very interesting. It crosses so many disciplines. Steep learning curves - thats for sure.

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