My Blackstone Lab Oil Report Analysis
Results 1 to 3 of 3

This is a discussion on My Blackstone Lab Oil Report Analysis within the General Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Accidents. forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; All information about my mileage, oil type, etc is on the report. The Oil was actually 10w40 Elements are quantified ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    4,016

    My Blackstone Lab Oil Report Analysis

    All information about my mileage, oil type, etc is on the report. The Oil was actually 10w40

    Elements are quantified in the oil at part per million levels (PPM). This list shows the most common sources of the elements in a gasoline or diesel engine oil.

    Aluminum : Pistons, bearings, cases (heads & blocks).
    Chromium: Rings, a trace element in steel.
    Iron: Cylinders, rotating shafts, the valve train, and any steel part sharing the oil.
    Copper: Brass or bronze parts, copper bushings, bearings, oil coolers, also an additive in some gasoline engine oils.
    Lead : Bearings.
    Tin: Bearings, bronze parts, piston coatings.
    Molybdenum: Anti-wear additive, some types of rings.
    Nickel: Trace element in steel.
    Manganese: Trace element, additive in gasoline.
    Silver: Trace element.
    Titanium: Trace element.
    Potassium : Antifreeze inhibitor, additive in some oil types.
    Boron: Detergent/dispersant additive, antifreeze inhibitors.
    Silicon : Airborne dirt, sealers, gaskets, antifreeze inhibitors.
    Sodium: Antifreeze inhibitors, additive in some gasoline engine oils.
    Calcium : Detergent/dispersant additive.
    Magnesium: Detergent/dispersant additive.
    Phosphorus: Anti-wear additive.
    Zinc: Anti-wear additive.
    Barium : Detergent/dispersant additive.

    Physical properties: Viscosity, flashpoint, % fuel and antifreeze, % water and insolubles are all measured in gasoline and diesel engine oils. If fuel is present in the oil, the viscosity and flashpoint will often be lower than what was stated in the "Should be" line. Insolubles are solid material that is centrifuged out of the oil. They are typically free carbon from the oxidation of the oil itself, along with blow-by past the rings.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GusOilSample.jpg  
    Last edited by gusto; 02-16-2005 at 06:53 AM.
    Vanitas vanitatum...et omnia vanitas

  2. Remove Advertisements
    ClubWRX.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Registered User spacemanspiff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Austin it is
    Posts
    634
    Wow, looks good.Your motor would also seem to be healthy. I've used Amsoil a lot in the past and even saw slightly better gas mileage. I would use it for my next oil change (I'm due right about now) but I haven't been able so far to find it in Austin. I saw Royal Purple at the local auto parts store and have heard good things about it, but I would prefer Amsoil. Thanks for the very cool post.
    A lot of power is good, more is better, and too much is perfect. I mean, if less is more, think how much more more is...

  4. #3
    Moderator MidKnight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bergen, NJ
    Posts
    4,711
    I Support ClubWRX
    Looks good! What brand of oil and filter were you using?
    '03 WRX
    '01 2.5RS
    MODS | PICS | Dyno
    "Stuff sold by the gram is always going to be more exciting than stuff sold by the pound." - Jeremy Clarkson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •