When bleeding the clutch
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This is a discussion on When bleeding the clutch within the General Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Accidents. forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; When bleeding the clutch you pull the pedal back toward you after stepping on it and excreting old fluid, but ...

  1. #1
    Banned JDMSubaru's Avatar
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    Exclamation When bleeding the clutch

    When bleeding the clutch you pull the pedal back toward you after stepping on it and excreting old fluid, but I want to know more specifically how to handle the pedal as you pull it back:

    -I know that the manual states that clutch pedal operation should be slow, but more specifically when you pull it up it gradually pushes itself up with greater pressure.

    Should you resist the pedal's natural popping back up into place to keep the operation slow like it says or should you not resist it?

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  3. #2
    Banned JDMSubaru's Avatar
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    vump

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    Banned JDMSubaru's Avatar
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    answer from somebody please

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    Registered User tarbaj's Avatar
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    Well I really don't know for sure but if it is returning on it's own I'd think you shouldn't have to pull it. You don't have to pull the brake pedal and the clutch is the exact same hydraulic type system. It should probably be let out slowly and not just jump off it again just like the brakes.

    You could always get a vacuum pump and use that to bleed it. Then you won't have tomess with the pedal.

  6. #5
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    I am not sure I understand your concern. When bleeding the clutch you have to:

    1. Top off the master cylinder with fresh fluid.
    2. Open the bleed valve on the slave cylinder, then push in the clutch.
    3. Close the bleed valve, then pull up the clutch (draws fluid from the master cylinder into the hydraulic system).
    4. Repeat steps 2-3 until the system has been bled...keep an eye on the master cylinder so it doesnt go dry or you will get air into the hydraulic system (thats bad).

    If you are already following these steps maybe the increase in resistance is the fact that you are replacing crappy fluid (maybe some gas bubbles) with nice fresh stuff.

    Hope this makes sense.
    -Bosco

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  7. #6
    Registered User Dale_K's Avatar
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    I don't know the answer but I like the turn of phrase 'excreting the fluid'.

  8. #7
    Moderator GV27's Avatar
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    You can just let it spring back - that's how the system works anyway. Of course it wouldn't hurt to slow it up either. The up side to controlling it is you create less of a whirlpool effect in the reservoir and if you're on the edge of running out of fluid up there, a slow release could mean the difference between sucking air back in or not. But if the reservoir is nice and full it makes no difference.
    "Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it to me." -Jesus

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    Banned JDMSubaru's Avatar
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    ok, how much is a vacuum bleeder...if i buy one will i no longer need to open bleed valves?

  10. #9
    Moderator GV27's Avatar
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    Not a lot.

    No, you'll still need to open bleeders. Just not as often.
    "Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it to me." -Jesus

    1990 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce
    1992 Toyota 4Runner SR5 3.Slow
    1993 Honda CBR600F2
    2002 WRX SportWagon *sold*

  11. #10
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    Initially you will have to pull the pedal up until soem of the air is out of the system at that point you can let it return under its own pressure. It really isn't that big of a deal. Vacuum bleeding will make the job alot easier at first, then cycle the clutch a while and finish using the manual method. It's easy.
    Remember: Freedom isn't free.
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