Parking on a hill
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This is a discussion on Parking on a hill within the General Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Accidents. forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; When i try to park in my steep uphill driveway, my 2003 Wrx wagon slips. It doesnt do it right ...

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    Parking on a hill

    When i try to park in my steep uphill driveway, my 2003 Wrx wagon slips. It doesnt do it right away, but after a few minutes in 1st gear and parking brake on, it rolls an inch, then another inch, etc. what is my problem?

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    OMG WTF MainFrame's Avatar
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    You could try tightening the parking brake.. mine doesn't move, even if I leave it in neutral (which is 98% of the time).

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    Registered User teflon_jones's Avatar
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    Most likely the parking brake cable is stretched from age and use so the rear brakes aren't gripping the caliper tightly enough to hold the car. You should also use reverse to get the best holding power on a hill, not 1st gear. Do you have a curb on your driveway so that you can angle the wheels so when it slips it will hit the curb to stop itself as a safety measure?

    How old are the rear brake pads and calipers? It shouldn't really make a difference but if they're really old and worn it's always possible. Another rare problem could be that a caliper is stuck (which I would say is highly unlikely). Normally they get stuck "closed" rather than "open" so you'd notice it when driving, but if you had a caliper that was stuck open, you might not notice it when driving, and it would mean the parking brake wouldn't work well.

    But my 99% bet is on the cable just being old and stretched out, so replacing it would solve your problem. Using reverse in the meantime would also certainly help. You could start by just trying to tighten the cable, but an old cable is going to have some play in it from age and that might just give very little help, help for only a short time, and/or no help.
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    He simply abides. SD_GR's Avatar
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    Parking on a hill

    Age and condition of calipers and pads are irrelevant. The hand brake actuates a drum that is distinct from the main disc brakes; the drum surface is the inner rear of the disc.

    Check cable. Follow manual to tighten from wheels (via peep holes with a geared wheel) and handle (via lock nut under console). Do both as per book. Unlikely drum liners are worn, I've not seen that but I suppose anything is possible.
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    Registered User nsibanez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SD_GR View Post
    Age and condition of calipers and pads are irrelevant. The hand brake actuates a drum that is distinct from the main disc brakes; the drum surface is the inner rear of the disc.

    Check cable. Follow manual to tighten from wheels (via peep holes with a geared wheel) and handle (via lock nut under console). Do both as per book. Unlikely drum liners are worn, I've not seen that but I suppose anything is possible.
    +1

    Tighten your drums all the way then back it off about 3-4 notches. Always tighten from your wheels first.
    Exactly what SD just said your drum shoes will not be worn down unless you use your ebrake for constant braking. They're only used to park

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    reverse?

    Quote Originally Posted by teflon_jones View Post
    Most likely the parking brake cable is stretched from age and use so the rear brakes aren't gripping the caliper tightly enough to hold the car. You should also use reverse to get the best holding power on a hill, not 1st gear. Do you have a curb on your driveway so that you can angle the wheels so when it slips it will hit the curb to stop itself as a safety measure?

    How old are the rear brake pads and calipers? It shouldn't really make a difference but if they're really old and worn it's always possible. Another rare problem could be that a caliper is stuck (which I would say is highly unlikely). Normally they get stuck "closed" rather than "open" so you'd notice it when driving, but if you had a caliper that was stuck open, you might not notice it when driving, and it would mean the parking brake wouldn't work well.

    But my 99% bet is on the cable just being old and stretched out, so replacing it would solve your problem. Using reverse in the meantime would also certainly help. You could start by just trying to tighten the cable, but an old cable is going to have some play in it from age and that might just give very little help, help for only a short time, and/or no help.
    So, if you're parking on an incline slope, you would put it in reverse instead of 1st? I hadn't heard that before. Any chance it could be the clutch wearing out?

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    OMG WTF MainFrame's Avatar
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    The symptoms of a clutch wearing out would be if your rmp quickly rise and the car does not accelerate accordingly.. usually first presents itself under high load, 4th gear wide open throttle, etc.

  9. #8
    Registered User Ingo's Avatar
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    If it's been driven with the parking brake dragging... Adjustment should do.
    If you're not using the parking brake when parking on your steep driveway and only have it in gear, this would indicate that the compression is slowly allowing the car to roll in like steps. Then it's time to actually use that brake... Of course you could also use wheel chocks.
    You can't have everything - where would you put it?

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