tree sap removal
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This is a discussion on tree sap removal within the Detailing Forum forums, part of the Tech & Modifying & General Repairs category; hey peeps- so I'm an idiot and parked close to a pine tree and got some sap on my baby. ...

  1. #1
    Roz
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    tree sap removal

    hey peeps-
    so I'm an idiot and parked close to a pine tree and got some sap on my baby. What is the best way to get that off? Goo Gone or something else? puhhhleeze help!!!

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    the way that i take sap off of cars is with one of those wash mits and i use my fingernail thru that. It normally take its off but make shure that all the sap is good and wet if that dont work then you can use goo gone i would advise it in small doeses if it does come to that
    Tomorrow isn't a guarantee.

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    Registered User volcomsoldier19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roz
    hey peeps-
    so I'm an idiot and parked close to a pine tree and got some sap on my baby. What is the best way to get that off? Goo Gone or something else? puhhhleeze help!!!

    the best way is to wash the whole car then use WD-40 lightly on treesap and it removes it, then wash the area with soap and water, i have done it to many cars many time and it works like a charm..
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    Registered User invadersevlow's Avatar
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    I'v always found a little rainx and paper towel will take sap right off.
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    Registered User ynotajb's Avatar
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    try a clay bar,, probably the best way to get any kind of contaminent off of your paint.

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    Registered User doublejz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ynotajb View Post
    try a clay bar,, probably the best way to get any kind of contaminent off of your paint.
    i think clay barring tree sap would be like dragging your shoe to get gum off of it.... it'll just smear it around.
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    Registered User afbluesv1k's Avatar
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    WD-40 FTW!!!! I used to clean my bike with furniture polish and WD-40 both non-invasive cleaners safe for paint.

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    Registered User cavallino333's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by afbluesv1k View Post
    WD-40 FTW!!!! I used to clean my bike with furniture polish and WD-40 both non-invasive cleaners safe for paint.
    Doesn't WD-40 contain petroleum distillates?
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    Tree Sap

    Removing tree sap from a car's finish is a bit more difficult than removing tar or bird droppings. Incorrectly removing hardened sap can scratch your paint. I've found that by hand rubbing the sap spots with mineral spirits, I'm able to easily remove the sap without damaging the finish. Mineral spirits acts as a solvent to break up and dissolve the sap.

    If there is a large amount of sap on the car, or if the sap has been left on the finish for an extended period of time, it can be a lot of work to remove. For these cases, I discovered that going over the affected areas with a light-duty rubbing compound removes the hardened surface of the sap spots. Then I can hit the sap with the mineral spirits to remove it. The light-duty rubbing compound softens the sap so the mineral spirits can do its job. The goal is to use the least pressure possible, to reduce the risk of scratching the paint. After removing heavy sap, I always buff the treated areas with a good polish to clean up any marks created during hand rubbing with solvent. The treated area must also be re-waxed.

    this is off of:
    http://www.autopia-carcare.com/inf-p...sh-clinic.html

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