2010 STi vs 2010 BMW 135i - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20

This is a discussion on 2010 STi vs 2010 BMW 135i within the Comparison: WRX vs World forums, part of the Community - Meet other Enthusiasts category; Originally Posted by oguitar I think the 135i and 335i are basically the same car but the 135i is supposed ...

  1. #16
    Registered User 03zWRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by oguitar View Post
    I think the 135i and 335i are basically the same car but the 135i is supposed to be slightly lighter and be more basic (less luxurious). I could be wrong though.

    The thing that makes these cars special IMHO is the small twin turbo setup. These cars start spooling like at 1500 RPM. BMW might have moved to a single turbo setup for newer models, but that I would have to check on.
    The BMW's have a bi-turbo setup. Smaller turbo inline with a larger turbo. Thats why they hit full boost so quickly. Also, it is very efficient because the larger turbo is bypassed unless there is a certain amount of throttle.
    2003 WRX - 33k miles
    Purchased 06/25/2010 from original owner
    Reverting some useless mods back to stock and getting protuned by TopSpeed of Atlanta soon!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    ClubWRX.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #17
    Registered User oguitar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
    Posts
    1,021
    The 335i and 135i both have/had a twin turbo setup. Not a bi-turbo setup. These cars are so fast because they have a 3L being fed by two small identical turbos. The STi and 135i weigh about the same. Luckily the STi has AWD which will help it on the track.

    Here is something I found.

    http://www.insideline.com/bmw/1-seri...35i-coupe.html

    And quote:
    But the 135i has a not-so-secret weapon that those lighter, earlier BMWs didn't have: a twin-turbocharged, direct-injected straight-6 engine that not only produces 300 hp but also packs a 300 pound-feet wallop of torque from 1,400 through 5,000 rpm.

    On the road, the power delivery of the turbo six is so smooth and relentless that it makes the 1 Series fast very fast but never furious. This engine simply grunts it out and pulls hard from the bottom of the tach to its redline at 7,000 rpm. And the thrill quotient goes up because all this is happening in a car that's almost 200 pounds lighter than the engine's customary 3 Series package.

    So the 1 Series coupe doesn't share the "too fat" problem of the 3 Series.

    At the track, the twin-turbo big hammer drove our 135i down the quarter-mile in 13.3 seconds at 104 mph. The 2008 Subaru WRX STI with 5 more hp and 48 fewer pounds does the same time in the quarter-mile, but with a slower 102.4-mph trap speed.

    While the STI edges the 135i's 5.0-second acceleration to 60 mph by a fraction thanks to the launch traction afforded by the Subie's all-wheel drive, the BMW ultimately has the legs at the top end and catches the STI at the finish line.

    This performance does nothing to dispel our continuing suspicion that the 300-hp rating of the twin-turbo inline-6 is conservative at best.

    End quote

    It would be a very good race to watch. If it was raining I would place my bet on the STi unless of course the BMW was a 335xi.
    Life is like riding a bicycle in order to keep your balance you must keep moving.

  4. #18
    Administrator RayfieldsWRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Old Folks Home
    Posts
    46,905
    I Support ClubWRX
    I was also of the impression that the X35 Bimmers used two identical, small turbos. Is there a link to info about a mismatched turbo setup?
    --Ray
    Grandfather of the Bugeye Mafia
    2013 Subaru BRZ Limited
    2002 Subaru WRX Bugeyebrid Wagon

  5. #19
    Registered User Heide264's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    4,168
    I Support ClubWRX
    This may very well end up being my largest toss up when it comes time to buy a car towards the end of winter... A used 135/335xi or a new STi. Still leaning towards the STi, but a few test drives are going to be the determining factor I have a feeling.

    I really like how "simple" the soobies are as opposed to a bmw. After having a 97 caddy, the last thing I do is want to deal with little things breaking that end up being very expensive. Hesitant to buy used or luxury-ish.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trainrex
    He was throwing balloons filled with sulfuric acid and shrapnel at the swat team. They finally had to take him down with rubber bullets.
    2011 STi Build Log
    -Part 1 - Reading, Data Logging, and Analyzing Data
    -Part 2 - Turbocharger 101 & Basic Boost Control
    -Part 3 - EcuFlash, Experimental Defintions, and a Drive By Wire Intro

  6. #20
    Registered User 03zWRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by oguitar View Post
    The 335i and 135i both have/had a twin turbo setup. Not a bi-turbo setup.
    I stand corrected. I was basing my info on a BMW-hugger friend of mine who obviously had his information a bit skewed as well. Here is a great quote I found clearing some of the confusion up

    Quote:
    there is no specific difference between twin turbo or bi-turbo. It's like saying inline six or straight six as an engine configuration.

    There are two kinds of twin (bi!) turbos. Sequential or Independent.

    Sequential uses a small turbo for low rev power, as smaller turbos spin up faster, meaning you get on boost quicker. However, small turbos can only pump smaller amounts of air, meaning they are no good for big power. This is why a second, larger turbo is plumbed in, which is normally blocked off from the exhaust gases at low engine speeds, but is activated once the smaller turbo begins to run out of puff.

    Yes, it was a PITA to engineer, I suspect. This sort of turbo system is found in the BMW X35D (diesel) engines.

    independent turbos have two turbos the same size, each of which are attached to half the total about of cylinders. So a 6 cylinder engine would have three of the cylinders blowing into one turbo, and three of the cylinders blowing into another. This allows quick spool up of the turbos, and relatively high powers. It is also a hell of a lot easier to engineer that a sequential turbo system.

    These sort of turbo systems are found in the new GTR for example, and the BMW X35i (petrol) engines.

    independent twin turbos are very popular in V formation engines, as you avoid some difficult plumbing getting both banks of exhaust gasses to the same place. Instead, you simply have one turbo per bank.
    End Quote.

    So BMWs do use mismatched turbos in their diesels, but not the gas engines.

    In any case, having that power curve start at such a low RPM and hold until such a high RPM must feel incredible! It would be VERY interesting to test drive them back to back. Thanks for the correction oguitar.
    2003 WRX - 33k miles
    Purchased 06/25/2010 from original owner
    Reverting some useless mods back to stock and getting protuned by TopSpeed of Atlanta soon!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •